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In order to provide more comprehensive and meaningful search results on our site, several reports are available for viewing and download directly from this web site. Kindly visit the main sites of the author organisations for more complete and updated information. We acknowledge our gratitude to the many people and sources whose work has been drawn freely upon. We thank them all.



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Child Health Advocacy Resources from PATH

With simple solutions alongside new technologies, we can defeat the leading killers of children. We invite you to use these resources from PATH and our partners to advocate for improved child health.

Understanding the problem
Understanding the problem

Publications that address child health broadly.

Pneumonia: Stories and multimedia

Videos, photo slideshows, infographics, and feature stories about pneumonia
Pneumonia: Solutions
Pneumonia: Solutions

Evidence about prevention and treatment approaches for pneumonia.
Diarrhea: Stories and multimedia
Diarrhea: Stories and multimedia

Videos, photo slideshows, infographics, and feature stories about diarrhea.
Diarrhea: Solutions
Diarrhea: Solutions

Included within this pinboard is evidence about prevention and treatment approaches for diarrhea.
Malaria: Stories and multimedia
Malaria: Stories and multimedia

Videos, photo slideshows, infographics, and feature stories about malaria.
Malaria: SolutionsPneumonia: Stories and multimedia
Malaria: Solutions

Evidence about prevention and treatment approaches for malaria.
Child health policies
Child health policies

Global strategies and other policies related to child health.
Vaccines
Vaccines

Resources related to immunization.
Nutrition
Nutrition

Resources related to nutrition.


END7: How to Shock a Celebrity

We asked celebrities including Emily Blunt, Eddie Redmayne and Priyanka Chopra to watch a powerful new video. See how they reacted to people suffering from neglected tropical diseases (NTDs)...Can you make it through to the end?

Visit http://www.end7.org to join the fight.

Most people have never heard of these seven diseases, but as you'll see on the video, NTDs can be horrific and are a major reason why poor communities stay trapped in poverty. It costs just 50 cents to treat and protect one person for an entire year. Visit http://www.end7.org/ to take action today. We would love for you to join us on the journey to 2020 -- together we can see the end!


One Million Community Health Workers One Million Community Health Workers

Across the central belt of sub-Saharan Africa, community health workers (CHWs) deliver life-saving health care services where it's needed most, in poor rural communities. In this region, 10 to 20 percent of children die before reaching the age of 5. Maternal death rates are high. Many people suffer unnecessarily from preventable and treatable diseases, from malaria and diarrhea to tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS. Many of these residents would otherwise have little or no access to the most fundamental aspects of modern medicine. Many countries are struggling to make progress toward the health related MDGs partly because so many people are poor and live in rural areas beyond the reach of modern health care.


Dr. Raxa Raxa

DrRaxa is a website focused at an Indian audience, who do not always have access to high quality medical information. This site will, we hope, provide them with information that they can trust, be appropriate to their social and economic circumstances and, most importantly, be of an 'international' quality. It is designed to be a one-stop site, where all the questions a person asks regarding his or her health problems, will be answered in clear and simple language. We provide health news, advice on how to keep fit, features on seasonal illnesses, and a list of where to find good medical care in the various parts of India.


Encyclopedia on Early Childhood Development Encyclopedia on Early Childhood Development

This encyclopaedia is an online tool that provides access to recent scientific studies on early childhood. Together, the Centro de Excelencia para el Desarrollo de la Primera Infancia (CEDPI - the Centre for Excellence in Early Childhood Development) and the Red Estratégica de Conocimientos sobre el Desarrollo de la Primera Infancia (REC-DPI - Strategic Knowledge Network on Early Childhood Development) produce the encyclopaedia, which is directed at politicians, planners, service providers, and parents.


Witness: Birth in Nepal

Nepal has some of the worst maternal death statistics in the world, with some six women dying in childbirth every day. Subina Shrestha, a Nepalese filmmaker who is herself five months pregnant, sets out to find out why so many mothers are dying in childbirth.

Witness is Al Jazeera English's flagship documentary strand, presenting two international documentaries each week which bear witness to the ordinary - and extraordinary - lives of people across the globe.




Practical Resources on Maternal Health Care, HIV/AIDS, and Human Resources for Health

ReproLinePlus provides technical resources for global health practice. Resources on the website can be used to train competent health care workers, strengthen health systems, improve quality ofcare, and build knowledge and skills. Topics include Maternal, Newborn and Child Health; Family Planning and Reproductive Health; HIV/AIDS Prevention and Care; Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment; Infection Prevention and Control; Malaria; and Tuberculosis.

MATERNAL HEALTH CARE
- Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth Training Package (2013)
This training package is designed for teams of frontline health workers who provide care at birth for women and newborns.

- Free e-learning courses on maternal health care for frontline workers
The Learning Opportunities section of ReproLinePlus offers free, e-learning courses on maternal health care topics such as managing postpartum hemorrhage, pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, prolonged and obstructed labor, and postabortion care.

HIV/AIDS
- PEPFAR's Best Practices for Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision Site Operations: A Service Guide for Site Operations (2013)
This guide provides implementing partners with a comprehensive and consistent process for establishing new VMMC services for HIV prevention.

HUMAN RESOURCES FOR HEALTH
- Systemic Management of Human Resources for Health: An Introduction for Health Managers (2013)
This manual presents the basic components of a human resources for health system, and explains why and how they have to work in synergy to contribute to the achievement of the health sector strategic goals.


Indian Hospital — An observational documentary series Indian Hospital — An observational documentary series

This unique observational documentary series shines a light on Indian society as it is rarely seen. In six one-hour programmes it illuminates the complexities and dilemmas of modern India through the extraordinarily varied lives of patients and medical staff working at the Narayana Hrudayalaya Hospital Complex in Bangalore, India.

This series follows the daily lives of patients and staff. The hospital and its stories mirror the very essence of Indian life. In this rich, varied and confronting series, stereotypes about Indians, India and Indian medicine will all be challenged.

Watch Episode 1Episode 2Episode 3Episode 4Episode 5Episode 6


Drugs, Doctors and Dinners: How drug companies influence health in the developing world Drugs, Doctors and Dinners: How drug companies influence health in the developing world

This is a report by Consumers International, published in 2007. (selected extracts below) Since 2007, have things improved, stayed the same, or got worse? In particular, what are governments and others doing to honour the World Health Assembly Resolution 2007 'to ban inaccurate, misleading or unethical promotion of medicines, to monitor drug promotion, and to develop and implement programmes that will provide independent, non-promotional information on medicines'?

Consumers International (CI) - 'In many developing countries, pharmaceutical companies have been accused of exploiting the lack of independent information available to medical professionals and patients. In the absence of independent sources doctors, the public and patients have to rely to a much greater extent on companies' marketing to tell them about the products that are available. When the information that is provided is misleading, biased and inaccurate it contributes to dangerous levels of mis-prescribing. Up to 50% of medicines in developing countries are inappropriately prescribed, dispensed or sold.'

'The problem is compounded when drug companies also release misleading messages and information to the public and patients. It is also estimated that 50% of patients in developing countries improperly use medicines. Such high levels of irrational use are likely to be having a disastrous impact on people's health resulting in reduced treatment efficacy and contributing to problems like drug resistance.'

'It is estimated that up to 50% of medicines in developing countries are inappropriately prescribed, dispensed or sold.'

The scheme of the [pharmaceutical] company was as follows: 'On sale of 1,000 samples of the drug, get a Motorola handset. On sale of 5,000 samples get an air cooler. On sale of 10,000 samples get a motor bike.' - Doctor from Mumbai India (2003) .... more


The Millennium Development Goals Report: Gender Chart 2012 The Millennium Development Goals Report: Gender Chart 2012

The biennial MDGs Gender Chart depicts the situation of women and girls in developing regions as reflected in a number of indicators that are used to monitor the MDGs. It shows that although there has been some progress in a number of the gender dimensions of the Goals, more needs to be done, in every country and at every level, to achieve the pivotal third MDG and to reduce persisting levels of inequality based on sex, wealth, location ethnicity and other markers of disadvantage.

With colourful graphs and striking statistics, this just-launched addendum to the UN Secretary General's 2012 Millennium Development Goals Report focuses specifically on Goal 3, which calls for gender equality and women's empowerment and also tracks the impact of gender equality on the achievement of each of the remaining seven MDGs.

It is being co-produced by UN Women and the UN Statistics Division for the Inter-Agency and Expert Group on MDGs Indicators.


How to Reach Young Adolescents: A toolkit for educating 10-14 year olds on sexual and reproductive health How to Reach Young Adolescents: A toolkit for educating 10-14 year olds on sexual and reproductive health

The rising population of young people in the developing world is the largest in history and will be for at least another 25 years. Many of these young people experience adolescence as an extended crisis that exposes them to life-changing - and sometimes life-threatening - situations. Most are not prepared for the abrupt changes that are coming. They lack information and life skills, protection and decision making power.

In some societies, girls as young as 10 years old are perceived as young women ready for marriage and childbearing, while boys of the same age have to support their families. Yet at a time when correct and gender equitable information is so important, studies show that most young adolescents lack the knowledge and skills to reduce risks associated with puberty. Therefore, young adolescents are vulnerable to sexual violence and coercion, unplanned pregnancy and early marriage.

40% of all new cases of HIV around the world are among young people aged 15-24 and some young people are already sexually active before the age of 15. Young people need to be educated about sex before they start having it so that they can protect themselves from HIV. Sexuality education must deal with risks and prevention in a culturally appropriate, age appropriate and gender sensitive manner.

Young adolescents have a right to receive the same information and access to health services as anyone else.


UNICEF - Committing to Child Survival - A Promise Renewed Almost 5,000 Indian Children Die Daily

In 2011, more children under the age of five died in India than anywhere else in the world. That's 1.7 million children – over 4,650 child deaths a day – according to a new report by the United Nation's Children's Fund.

Even on a per-capita basis, India does poorly. The study estimates that for every 1,000 children born in India, 61 are unlikely to make it to their fifth birthday. That rate is higher than, say, in Rwanda (54 child deaths), Nepal (48 child deaths) or Cambodia (43 child deaths).

The report showed the main causes of child deaths worldwide are pneumonia, responsible for 18% of deaths, followed by diarrhea (11% of deaths). India stands out for the prevalence of diarrhea as a killer of infants. Diarrhea was responsible for 13% of child deaths in India in 2010 – the second-highest rate after Afghanistan.

Associated with poor sanitation, malnutrition and lack of access to basic healthcare services, this is an easily preventable disease that strikes mainly the poor. Washing hands with soap, clean drinking water and putting an end to open defecation – which the report found is a major cause of diarrhea in South Asia – are easy preventative measures.


Sample Registration System (SRS) India: Infant mortality rate comes down by 3 points

27 October, 2012 - The infant mortality rate in India has come down to 44 from 47 deaths per 1,000 live births over the last one year, the Union Health Ministry said on Friday. According to the October bulletin of the Sample Registration System (SRS) released by the Registrar General of India, the IMR for rural areas has dropped by three points from 51 to 48 infant deaths per 1000 live births while the urban rate now stands at 29 from the previous 31/1000, it said.

Registration of births and deaths is an important source for demographic data for socio-economic development and population control in developing countries. The data on population growth, fertility and mortality serves as the starting point for population projections. Apart from these vital indicators, an adequate evaluation of a number of programs in the health sector, including family planning, maternal and reproductive health, immunization programs, is dependent upon the availability of accurate, up-to-date fertility and mortality data. In India, the need for dependable demographic data was felt soon after independence heralding the era of five year planning.

View and Download reports from Census of India:

Census of India Sample Registration System Statistical Report 2010 pdf, 60 kb
Introduction pdf, 52 kb
Population Composition pdf, 93 kb
Estimates of Fertility Indicators pdf, 167 kb
Estimates of Mortality Indicators pdf, 123 kb
Flow Chart pdf, 9 kb
Charts pdf, 5.87 mb
Executive Summary pdf, 25 kb
Annexure xls, 3.78 mb
Figures at a Glance, India - 2010 xls, 42 kb
Detailed Tables xls, 1.01 mb


Why Poverty? Join a Global Debate. Watch Amazing Films. Ask Questions about Poverty.

All over the world this week, people are watching films and asking Why Poverty? Be part of it.

Animation
Animation
Project Trailer
Project Trailer: join the global debate
Solar Mamas
1. Solar Mamas

A film about the heroic efforts of one woman as she overcomes significant difficulties to become a solar engineer.
more info
Stealing Africa
2. Stealing Africa
How much profit is fair?

Stealing Africa describes the tax system employed by multinational companies in Africa
more info
Give Us the Money
3. Give Us the Money

Bob Geldof, Bono and fellow activist Bill Gates speak candidly about the lobbying, strategising and back room deals involved in their near 30 years of activism against poverty…
more info
Land Rush
4. Land Rush: How do you feed the world?

In 2008 the world's food system began to fall apart. Threatened with hunger, rich countries started buying up and leasing fertile tracks of the developing world.
more info
Park Avenue
5. Park Avenue: Money, Power and the American Dream

How much inequality is too much? In New York, 740 Park Ave is home to some of the wealthiest Americans. 10 minutes to the north, over the Harlem River, is the other Park Avenue in South Bronx, where more than half the population needs food stamps and children are 20 times more likely to be killed.
more info
Education, Education
6. Education, Education

In China, where an education was once valued and thought to be a way out of poverty, it is now questionable as a route to economic security.
more info
Welcome to the World
7. Welcome to the World

Looks at the fact that every year 130 million babies are born, but their chances in life depend on the lottery of where, how and to whom they are born.
more info
Poor Us
8. Poor Us: An Animated History

…begins in the Neolithic Age and takes the viewer through the changing world of poverty. It is a sinister and at times…
more info

9. Short films on subjects as diverse as Waste, Bags, Love, Barrels, Coal and Poop
Review many of the short films and access the trailers. Titles include: Wilbur goes Poor; Colours in the Dust; The Crisis and the Sunglasses; Poop on Poverty; and, Afghan Girl...question: These films raise loads of really important questions - Your answers to which could have very significant implications for your strategies and programmes


Global perspective on early diagnosis and intervention for children with developmental delays and disabilities

"We must begin to accept that improving quality of life of the increasing numbers of surviving children, and not simply reduction of mortality, should be the goal of global health efforts.

Accordingly, GH partnerships must bring together resources for health worker education at all levels to understand and appreciate this approach, broaden health planning by governments, foundations, and NGOs, and begin to build the needed infrastructure in rehabilitation services and education at the local level."
- Alfred L. Scherzer, MD, EdD, FAAP

Low- andmiddle-income countries are experiencing a significant reduction in mortality of children under 5 years of age. This reduction is bringing in its wake large numbers of surviving children with developmental delays and disabilities. Very little attention has been paid to these children, most of whomreceiveminimal or no support. Thus, there is an urgent need to recognize that improving the quality of life of the survivors must complement mortality reduction in healthcare practice and programs. The incorporation of early evaluation and intervention programs into routine pediatric care is likely to have the most impact on the quality of life of these children. We therefore call for leadership frompractitioners, governments, and international organizations to prioritize regular childhood developmental surveillance for possible delays and disabilities, and to pursue early referral for intervention.


Progress on drinking water and sanitation - 2012 update Progress on drinking water and sanitation - 2012 update

The report brings welcome news: measured by the proxy-indicator consistently used by the JMP since 2000, the MDG drinking-water target was met in 2010, five years ahead of schedule. However, the job is far from done. An estimated 780 million still lacked safe drinking water in 2010, and the world is unlikely to meet the MDG sanitation target. A reduction in urban-rural disparities and inequities associated with poverty; drinking-water coverage in countries in sub-Saharan Africa and Oceania; putting sanitation 'on track'; and universal coverage beyond 2015 all remain high on the development and public health agenda.

Editors: WHO; UNICEF, 58 pages, March 2012, English
Download the publication (split into chapters) - Download the publication (full text)


Guidelines on Basic Newborn Resuscitation Guidelines on Basic Newborn Resuscitation

Globally, about one quarter of all neonatal deaths are caused by birth asphyxia. In this document, birth asphyxia is defined simply as the failure to initiate and sustain breathing at birth. Effective resuscitation at birth can prevent a large proportion of these deaths. The need for clinical guidelines on basic newborn resuscitation, suitable for settings with limited resources, is universally recognized. WHO had responded to this need by developing guidelines for this purpose that are contained in the document Basic newborn resuscitation: a practical guide. As this document is over a decade old, a process to update the guidelines on basic newborn resuscitation was initiated in 2009.

The objective of these updated WHO guidelines is to ensure that newborns in resource-limited settings who require resuscitation are effectively resuscitated. These guidelines will inform WHO training and reference materials, such as Pregnancy, childbirth, postpartum and newborn care: a guide for essential practice; Essential newborn care course; Managing newborn problems: a guide for doctors, nurses and midwives; and Pocket book of hospital care for children: guidelines for the management of common illnesses with limited resources. These guidelines will assist programme managers responsible for implementing maternal and child health programmes to develop or adapt national or local guidelines, standards and training materials on newborn care. Download .pdf




Health Workers, the Heart Beat of Healthcare

Health Workers Count: The World Needs More Health Workers, Better Supported

No Child Out of Reach: Time to end the health worker crisis - Download pdf

The current shortage of over 3.5 million doctors, nurses, midwives and community health workers means that millions of children do not receive the health care they need, and risk an early death from preventable causes. We cannot achieve the goal of saving 15 million children’s lives by 2015 unless a health worker – with the right skills, equipment and support – is within reach of every child.

More Health Workers - The world is suffering from a massive gap of more than 3.5 million health workers. Join with hundreds of organisations who have already signed up to our urgent call for more health workers, better supported. click here

Putting Health Workers First

"The focus of all our efforts should be on enabling healthcare providers to deliver evidence-based health care for all. A SEISMIC shift is needed progressively to understand and address the full range of basic needs of healthcare providers in low- and middle-income countries: Skills, Equipment, Information, Structural support, Medicines, Incentives (including a decent salary) and Communication facilities." - Neil Pakenham-Walsh, Coordinator - HIFA2015 campaign

Governments and funding agencies should absorb and keep constantly in mind the words of Lincoln Chen and colleagues:

"Indeed, the only route to reaching the Health MDGs is through the health worker: there are no shortcuts."

(Chen L et al. Human resources for health: overcoming the crisis. The Lancet, Volume 364, Issue 9449, Pages 1984 - 1990, 27 November 2004).


Where There Is No Dentist Where There Is No Dentist

by Murray Dickson
updated and expanded with information about HIV and AIDS by Richard Bebermeyer, Martin Hobdell and Gene Stevenson - Hesperian, 15th printing (updated), July 2012
248 pp. 11.9 MB - Download .pdf

The 2012 edition of Where There Is No Dentist features a new section on how to do Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART), a permanent way to fill cavities without the use of a dental drill that was first pioneered in Tanzania in the mid-80s and is now used by health workers and dental workers in many parts of the world. Also updated was the In-formation on other training materials, resources, and where to get dental supplies. This book is an important companion to the 2011 printing of Where There Is No Doctor.



UNICEF - A Promise Renewed UNICEF - Commiting to Child Survival - A Promise Renewed

13 September 2012 - Data released today by UNICEF and the United Nations Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation show that the number of children under the age of 5 dying globally has dropped from nearly 12 million in 1990 to an estimated 6.9 million in 2011.

UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake says, "The global decline in under-5 mortality is a significant success that is a testament to the work and dedication of many, including governments, donors, agencies and families. But there is also unfinished business: Millions of children under 5 are still dying each year from largely preventable causes for which there are proven, affordable interventions."

He stresses, "These lives could be saved with vaccines, adequate nutrition and basic medical and maternal care. The world has the technology and know-how to do so. The challenge is to make these available to every child."

 


Video

UNICEF reports on progress made in reducing child deaths worldwide

Progress report

Committing to Child Survival: A Promise Renewed

Video

World embraces goal of ending preventable child deaths

Photoessay

Committing to child survival


Results for Children Results for Children

An Update from Save the Children

The 2012 edition of the Child Development Index tells a story of success. The edition shows that substantial progress has been made in addressing the most basic threats to child survival and well-being. On average, the lives of children around the world in the indicators measured improved by more than 30%. This means that the chances of a child going to school were one-third higher, and the chances of an infant dying before their fifth birthday were one-third lower at the end of the 2000s than a decade before. Overall, during this period child well-being improved in 90% of the countries surveyed.

Download Report .pdf


Access to Knowledge: A Guide for Everyone Access to Knowledge: A Guide for Everyone

This handbook, Access to Knowledge: A Guide for Everyone, is a part of that broader programme. Its aim is to provide a concise and nonspecialist introduction to IP and A2K issues, and selected related issues of communications rights and access to information and communication technologies (ICTs). Its intended readership includes consumer groups and NGOs (non-governmental organisations) who wish to become more knowledgeable in this area, individual academics and activists who could use a simple reference guide to the many related issues of A2K, and consumers at large who are affected by unfair IP laws and practices.

On this note, whilst A2K has not always been high on the agenda of the global consumer movement, CI believes that it is very much of a consumer issue, on a par with the more traditional consumer issues such as food and product safety, sustainable consumption, and unethical marketing. After all, many activities that now form part of consumers' everyday lives, such as accessing learningmaterials, transferringmusic, videos or e-books from one device to another, and sharing their interests online, are deeply impacted by IP laws and policies.
Download .pdf


Child Development Index 2012 The Child Development Index 2012: Progress, challenges and inequality

By Save the Children

The 2012 edition of the Child Development Index tells a story of success. The edition shows that substantial progress has been made in addressing the most basic threats to child survival and well-being. On average, the lives of children around the world in the indicators measured improved by more than 30%. This means that the chances of a child going to school were one-third higher, and the chances of an infant dying before their fifth birthday were one-third lower at the end of the 2000s than a decade before. Overall, during this period child well-being improved in 90% of the countries surveyed.

Download Report .pdf


Millennium Development Goals Report 2012 Millennium Development Goals Report 2012

by Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN DESA) on Jul 02, 2012

The Millennium Development Goals Report 2012 was launched in New York by the Secretary-General on 2 July 2012. The report presents the yearly assessment of global progress towards the MDGs, highlighting several milestones – three important MDG targets have been met well ahead of the target date of 2015. The report says that meeting the remaining targets, while challenging, remain possible - but only if Governments do not waiver from their commitments made over a decade ago. The report is based on a master set of data compiled by the Inter-Agency and Expert Group on MDG indicators led by the Statistics Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs.

Download Report .pdf Chinese - English - French - Russian | Report at SlideShare
Watch Videos: Millennium Development Goals - What are they? | MDG | MDG for 2015 | Achieving the MDGs


Translators Without Borders Translators Without Borders

The work of Translators without Borders is of crucial importance for the success of humanitarian projects. Information available in the local language is much more effective than in a foreign language. This is true for engineering and construction projects (such as digging water wells), and agricultural projects (such as how to irrigate the land). But it is particularly important in healthcare. In many areas in the world people do not only die from diseases, but also from the fact that they do not have basic information about how to stay healthy and what to do to prevent disease.

If you are a translator and you are willing to donate your time and professional skills to Translators without Borders, you will directly support humanitarian projects. To join TWB, we ask you to fill in the translator application form.


Every Child Deserves a 5th Birthday Every Child Deserves a 5th Birthday

This year, more than 7 million children will die before they turn 5. Most of these children live in poor countries, and their deaths are largely preventable.

We Know What Works: Child mortality has been reduced by 70% over the last 50 years. We must expand access to lifesaving solutions while developing new tools needed to take us the last mile.

JAMA: "Every Child Deserves a 5th Birthday" - Campaigns Target Child Survival, Preterm Birth


Nonprofits Have an Important Role in Social Change. Nonprofits Have an Important Role in Social Change.

Nonprofit organizations are one of the top two ways adults are most likely to get involved in positive social change. On average, about half of adults agree nonprofits make it easy for people to be involved in social change.

Globally, adults are morelikely to agree with the three POSITIVE attributes or strengths of nonprofit organizations presented than the three NEGATIVE attributes or weaknesses presented.

Source: Walden University's 2012 Social Change Impact Report. Conducted by Harris Interactive, Feb.–March 2012.





Helping Babies Breathe Implementation Guide Helping Babies Breathe Implementation Guide

Objective: To ensure that all babies are born with a skilled birth attendant present.

Helping Babies Breathe is a neonatal resuscitation curriculum for resource-limited circumstances. It was developed on the premise that assessment at birth and simple newborn care are things that every baby deserves. The initial steps taught in HBB can save lives and give a much better start to many babies who struggle to breathe at birth. The focus is to meet the needs of every baby born.

The Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) Implementation Guide is a tool for advancing sustainable national programs for newborn and maternal health. For maximum impact, HBB should be integrated into existing newborn or maternal health training, but it can be implemented as a stand-alone program, depending on national priorities.



Trends in Maternal Mortality:1990-2010 Trends in Maternal Mortality: 1990-2010

By UNFPA, UNICEF, WHO, World Bank; May 2012
Globally, the total number of maternal deaths decreased by from 543,000 in 1990 to 287,000 in 2010. Likewise, the global maternal mortality ratio (MMR) declined from 400 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births in 1990 to 210 in 2010, representing an average annual decline of 3.1 per cent.

All developing regions experienced a decline in MMR between 1990 and 2010, with the highest reduction in the 20-year period in Eastern Asia (69 per cent) followed by Northern Africa (66 per cent), Southern Asia (64 per cent), Sub-Saharan Africa (41 per cent), Latin America and the Caribbean (41 per cent), Oceania (38 per cent) and finally Caucasus and Central Asia (35 per cent).

Download pdf report


Building a Future for Women and Children: The 2012 Report Building a Future for Women and Children: The 2012 Report

Countdown launched its 2012 Report on June 14, 2012, at the Child Survival Call to Action, a two-day high-level meeting in Washington, D.C. This conference, convened by the governments of the U.S., Ethiopia, and India in collaboration with UNICEF, charted a course toward the end of preventable child deaths around the world.

The 2012 Report, Building a Future for Women and Children, highlights country progress—and obstacles to progress—towards achieving Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 to reduce child mortality and improve maternal health. It focuses, like previous Countdown reports, on evidence-based solutions—health interventions proven to save lives—and on the health systems, policies, financing and broader contextual factors that affect the equitable delivery of these interventions to women and children. Country profiles for 75 Countdown countries were published together with the report.


Video: World embraces goal of ending preventable child deaths - Child Survival Call to Action - 14-15 June 2012


Preparing the Next Generation of Community Health Workers: The Power of Technology for Training Preparing the Next Generation of Community Health Workers: The Power of Technology for Training

May 2012 - A generation ago, few would have dreamed that mobile technology would create five billion points of contact around the world or that nine out of 10 internet users in Sub-Saharan Africa would access the internet through mobile devices. They could not have imagined how innovative technologies such as Skype, Facebook, and African-born solutions like M-PESA would transform spheres of business, politics, and society. What if these same, disruptive technologies could be applied to transform global health for the next generation?

This study builds on the momentum and excitement generated by the launch of mHealth Education at the 2011 Mobile Health Summit in Cape Town regarding the use of mobile technology to support health education and training in developing countries. The findings and analysis presented in the chapters that follow would not have been possible without the individuals from more than 30 organizations who shared their insights, data and perspectives, as well as the peer reviewers, who provided valuable feedback and refinements.

Download pdf report


7.6 million deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2010

Latest estimates of causes of child mortality in 2010 with time trends since 2000

The Lancet - 11 May 2012 - Child survival strategies should direct resources toward the leading causes of child mortality, with attention focusing on infectious and neonatal causes. More rapid decreases from 2010—15 will need accelerated reduction for the most common causes of death, notably pneumonia and preterm birth complications. Continued efforts to gather high-quality data and enhance estimation methods are essential for the improvement of future estimates.


Pneumonia and diarrhoea: Tackling the deadliest diseases for the world’s poorest children

Pneumonia and diarrhoea: Tackling the deadliest diseases for the world’s poorest children8 June 2012 – Preventing and treating pneumonia and diarrhoea – the two leading causes of death among children under five – can help save the lives of more than two million children, according to a report released today by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF).

“We know what works against pneumonia and diarrhoea – the two illnesses that hit the poorest hardest,” UNICEF’s Executive Director, Anthony Lake, said in a news release. “Scaling up simple interventions could overcome two of the biggest obstacles to increasing child survival, help give every child a fair chance to grow and thrive.”

Pneumonia and diarrhoea account for nearly one-third of the deaths among children under five globally – or more than 2 million lives each year. Nearly 90 per cent of deaths from pneumonia and diarrhoea occur in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.

The prevention and treatments for both diseases often overlap, and include such basic steps as: increasing vaccine coverage; encouraging breastfeeding and hand-washing with soap; expanding access to safe drinking water and sanitation; and disseminating oral rehydration salts to children with diarrhoea and antibiotics to children with bacterial pneumonia.  Download pdf report


Towards ending preventable child deaths
Margaret Chan, Director-General of WHO and Anthony Lake, Executive Director of UNICEF

"'We, as the leaders of WHO and UNICEF, are personally committed to the achievement of MDG 4 and new targets introduced through A Call to Action and A Promise Renewed. The two agencies will work in an even closer collaboration to support countries to achieve universal coverage of effective interventions - and effectively put an end to preventable child deaths."

Thanks in large part to the increased attention to maternal and child survival brought about by the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the world has made substantial progress in reducing child mortality over the past two decades. The number of deaths among children younger than 5 years has declined from more than 12 million in 1990 to 7·6 million in 2010. The mortality rate in children under 5 years has dropped from 88 deaths per 1000 livebirths in 1990 to 57 in 2010—a 35% reduction. The rate of decline in the under 5 mortality rate has accelerated from 1·9% a year from 1990 to 2000 to 2·5% a year from 2000 to 2010. The rate of reduction has doubled in sub-Saharan Africa. These gains underline the importance of having clearly defined targets, especially when they are combined with mechanisms for monitoring progress, ensuring equity, and promoting accountability.


Social autopsy and lack of healthcare knowledge as a contributing factor to avoidable death

The importance of understanding the circumstances, decisions and actions that lead to individual preventable deaths:

'Every death is the result of a chain of circumstances, decisions and actions - a chain that could be broken, and a death avoided, by something as simple as very basic healthcare knowledge. This kind of research, which is sometimes called social autopsy, is difficult and challenging as it involves in-depth interviews with bereaved family members. But every death has an important story to tell and vital lessons to be learned. A thematic analysis of these stories would help families, communities, health workers and policymakers to avoid further deaths in the future.' - Neil Pakenham-Walsh, HIFA2015, June 2011


Saving ChildrenTools that enable health workers to carefully review each death that occurs in their institution with the goal of breaking the 'chain to death':

The Child Healthcare Problem Identification Programme (Child PIP) - over 31 000 child deaths, many of which include information on modifiable factors in health facilities, during transit, in clinics and at home.

Perinatal Problem Identification Program - (PPIP) Perinatal Mortality Audit Tool - At present this database contains data of more than 1,800,000 births. If you are involved in perinatal health care, you can become part of this national effort to improve the care our mothers and babies receive.

The Saving Children reports give an overview of child mortality in South African hospitals, using the Child PIP mortality audit process to assess the quality of care that children receive in the South African health system. Through this process, problems are identified and solutions devised at local, provincial and national levels, which can lead to improvements in quality of care and ultimately to reduced in-hospital mortality for children.

Global child survival: beyond numbers - Zulfiqar A Bhutta - The Lancet, Volume 379, Issue 9832, Pages 2126 - 2128, 9 June 2012


World Health Statistics 2012

World Health Statistics 2012 World Health Statistics 2012 contains WHO's annual compilation of health-related data for its 194 Member States, and includes a summary of the progress made towards achieving the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and associated targets. This year, it also includes highlight summaries on the topics of noncommunicable diseases, universal health coverage and civil registration coverage.

Progress on the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) Fact sheet N°290

Download the Summary Brochure - Available in English pdf, 381kb - French pdf, 389kb - Spanish pdf, 389kb
Download the Full Report - Available in English pdf, 2.47Mb - French pdf, 2.69Mb - Spanish pdf, 2.84Mb

Download the Report in English, by Section
Table of contents and introduction pdf, 144kb
Part I. Health-related Millennium Development Goals pdf, 437kb
Part II. Highlighted topics pdf, 253kb
Part III. Global health indicators pdf, 1.26Mb


State of the World's Refugees 2012 - In Search of Solidarity

State of the World's Refugees 2012 - In Search of Solidarity Factors causing mass population flight are growing and over the coming decade more people on the move will become refugees or displaced within their own country. Displacement from conflict was becoming compounded by a combination of causes, including climate change, population growth, urbanization, food insecurity, water scarcity and resource competition.

All these factors are interacting with each other, increasing instability and conflict and forcing people to move. In a world that is becoming smaller and smaller, finding solutions, he said, would need determined international political will.




Solution Exchange– Leverage Knowledge – Accelerate Development

Solution ExchangeSolution Exchange is a Knowledge Management initiative of the United Nations Country Team in India. The brand is recognized by development professionals as a platform for exchange of ideas and dialogue between different stakeholders. SE membership is a talent pool of more than 35,000 subscriptions including practitioners from civil society, grass roots organizations, academics, research institutions and government who come together to share knowledge and best practices, provide solutions and address development challenges. There are 13 Communities of Practice organized around national priorities and MDGs, facilitated by different UN agencies. Solution Exchange (SE) offers a free, impartial space where all partners are welcome members of the community.

Maternal and Child Health Community of Practice of Solution Exchange aids in addressing the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) relating to improving maternal and child health and to reducing maternal, infant and child mortality. The community has been in existence for last 7 years with a membership of about 4,000 MCH practitioners, has discussed over 190 issues which are available here- Maternal and Child Health Community - For queries and subscription, write to se-mch@solutionexchange.un.in


Break the Silence: Respectful Maternity Care

Break the Silence: Respectful Maternity CareWhat do you picture when you think of the way you'd want to be treated when it's time to have a baby? Pregnant women around the world seeking maternity care from the health systems in their countries instead receive ill treatment that ranges from disrespect of their autonomy and dignity to outright abuse: physical assault, verbal insults, discrimination, abandonment, or detention in facilities for failure to pay. Disrespect and abuse during maternity care are a violation of a woman's basic human rights. We have to break the silence.

Watch the Video - Join Us: Find Out, Speak Out.



State of the World's Mothers State of the World's Mothers

Save the Children's State of the World's Mothers 2012 Report

"Our research shows that a mother's breast milk — one single nutrition intervention — can save a million children's lives each year,... All mothers should have the support they need to choose to breastfeed if they want to. Breastfeeding is good for babies no matter where they live, but in developing countries, especially those without access to clean water, breastfeeding can be a matter of life or death."

 

A Curriculum:
Elementary Units and Lessons: Middle School Units and Lessons:
High School Units and Lessons: Informational Papers


Born too soon: the global action report on preterm birth Born Too Soon: the global action report on preterm birth

15 Million babies born too soon. 1.1 Million preterm babies die every year, but with inexpensive treatment 75% could survive

Born too soon: the global action report on preterm birth
provides the first-ever national, regional and global estimates of preterm birth. The report shows the extent to which preterm birth is on the rise in most countries, and is now the second leading cause of death globally for children under five, after pneumonia.

Addressing preterm birth is now an urgent priority for reaching Millennium Development Goal 4, calling for the reduction of child deaths by two-thirds by 2015. This report shows that rapid change is possible and identifies priority actions for everyone.

This inspiring report is a joint effort of almost 50 international, regional and national organizations, led by the March of Dimes, The Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health, Save the Children and the World Health Organization in support of the Every Woman Every Child effort, led by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

Lancet Article: National, regional, and worldwide estimates of preterm birth rates in the year 2010 with time trends since 1990 for selected countries: a systematic analysis and implications

Preterm birth is the second largest direct cause of child deaths in children younger than 5 years. Yet, data regarding preterm birth (<37 completed weeks of gestation) are not routinely collected by UN agencies, and no systematic country estimates nor time trend analyses have been done. We report worldwide, regional, and national estimates of preterm birth rates for 184 countries in 2010 with time trends for selected countries, and provide a quantitative assessment of the uncertainty surrounding these estimates.


Progress for Children Progress for Children: A report card on adolescents

Adolescence is a formative period during which children grow into their rightful place as full citizens and agents of change in their own lives and the lives of their societies. Progress for Children: A report card on adolescents provides an overview of the situation of adolescents, including of their vulnerabilities in critical areas. It makes a compelling case for increased efforts in advocacy, programming and policy, and for investment, to ensure the rights of adolescents and to achieve the Millennium Development Goals.

Download PDF - UNICEF - 52 pages - April 2012 - ISBN: 978-92-806-4629-0

Putting adolescents at the centre of health and development - The Lancet, Volume 379, Issue 9826, Page 1561, 28 April 2012


Health Education To Villages Causes of Child Deaths

According to UNICEF, of the 8.1 million child deaths (under-5s) in 2009, most (and 70% in developing countries) result from one the following five causes or a combination thereof: acute respiratory infections, diarrhoea, measles, malaria and malnutrition.

Two-thirds of deaths are preventable. Malnutrition, which weakens the body's resistance to illness, and the lack of safe water and sanitation contribute to half of all these children’s deaths. Millions more survive only to face diminished futures, unable to develop to their full potential. Research and experience show that most of the children who die each year could be saved by low-tech, evidence-based, cost-effective measures such as vaccines, antibiotics, micronutrient supplementation, insecticide-treated bed nets, improved family care and breastfeeding practices, and oral rehydration therapy. In addition to providing vaccines and antibiotics to children, education could also be provided to mothers about how they can make simple changes to living conditions such as improving hygiene in order to increase the health of their children. Mothers who are educated will also have increased confidence in the ability to take care of their children, therefore providing a healthier relationship and environment for them.


Inventing a Toilet for the 21st Century Inventing a Toilet for the 21st Century

Toilets are extremely important for public health, and – when you think of it – even human dignity. For most of us living in the developed world, we often don't give them much thought.

The flush toilets we use in the wealthy world are irrelevant, impractical and impossible for 40 percent of the global population, because they often don't have access to water, and sewers, electricity, and sewage treatment systems. Worldwide, there are 2.5 billion people without access to safe sanitation—including 1 billion people who still defecate out in the open and more than 1 billion others who must use pit latrines.

Food and water tainted with fecal matter causes diarrheal diseases that kill 1.5 million children every year - more than the annual deaths from AIDS and malaria combined.

Bill Gates looks to new toilets to improve world sanitation


Percentage of Households having no laterine - India 2001-2011 India Census: more people have a mobile phone than a household toilet

Nearly half of India's 1.2 billion people have no toilet at home, but more people own a mobile phone, according to the country's latest census data. Only 46.9% of the 246.6 million households have toilets while 49.8% defecate in the open. The remaining 3.2% use public toilets.

Census of India 2011 - Availability and Type of Latrine Facility: 2001-2011 - Census 2011 data on houses, household amenities and assets reveal that 63.2% of homes have a telephone. More than half the population – 53.2% – have a mobile phone.

About 77% of homes in the eastern state of Jharkhand have no toilet facilities, while the figure is 76.6% for Orissa and 75.8% in Bihar. All three are among India's poorest states. In Jammu & Kashmir 8.9% of households still have their latrines emptied by manual scavengers.

"Open defecation continues to be a big concern for the country as almost half of the population do it," Registrar General and Census Commissioner C. Chandramouli said while releasing the latest data. "Cultural and traditional reasons and a lack of education are the prime reasons for this unhygienic practice. We have to do a lot in these fronts," he said.

For more information read the full set of statistics on Availability and Type of Latrine Facility: 2001-2011


Safe Pregnancy and Birth Mobile App Safe Pregnancy and Birth Mobile App - Hesperian Health Guides.

Explore the app - Hesperian’s comprehensive app on pregnancy and birth contains a wealth of information on:

• how to stay healthy during pregnancy
• how to recognize danger signs during pregnancy, birth, and after birth
• what to do when a danger sign arises
• when to refer a woman to emergency care
• instructions for community health workers with step-by-step explanations such as "How to take blood pressure", "How to treat someone in shock", "How to stop bleeding".

For iPhone and iPod Touch: Download the app for free from the iTunes store.

For Android: Download the beta release of the Android version for free from the Google Play app store.

As this is a beta release, we are aware that it still needs a little work in places. We welcome feedback and code contributions to help improve the experience. Please reach out to us at mobile@hesperian.org, and you can find the source code here.

Don’t have an iPhone or Android? If you don’t have an iPhone or iPod Touch, you can preview the app here. (Please keep in mind that the app was built to be viewed on a mobile device, so please forgive us if the quality is not perfect.)


The State of the World's Children 2012 - Children in an Urban World The State of the World's Children 2012 - Children in an Urban World

Hundreds of millions of children today live in urban slums, many without access to basic services.

We must do more to reach all children in need, wherever they are excluded and left behind. Some might ask whether we can afford to do this, especially at a time of austerity. But if we overcome the barriers that have kept these children from the services that they need and that are theirs by right, then millions more will grow up healthy, attend school and live more productive lives.

Can we afford not to do this? - Anthony Lake - Executive Director, UNICEF


Baby Massage DVD

Hands to Hearts International’s Baby Massage DVD teaches basic baby massage strokes that not only make your little one happy but build loving bonds crucial to their development. When you purchase our Baby Massage DVD for yourself, or as a gift, you’re contributing to HHI’s work with orphaned and vulnerable children around India.

Learn more about Hands to Hearts International at www.handstohearts.org

Baby Massage DVDBenefits of Baby Massage:

* Reduces baby’s fussiness and crying
* Improves baby’s sleep
* Decreases constipation and colic
* Increases bond between parent and child
* Relaxing for baby and parent
* Filmed in India.  The DVD is available in English, with subtitles in the following 18 languages: Arabic, Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), Danish, Finnish, French, Hindi, Japanese, Oriya, Romanian, Russian, Slovenian, Spanish, Tamil, Telugu, Turkish, Ukrainian and Vietnamese.

Along with your DVD you’ll receive an instructional poster with pictures to guide your baby massage. Cost: $25 USD, shipping included for a limited time. Order here.


Fact File on Health Inequities

In developing countries, one child in 10 dies before reaching their fifth birthday, compared with 1 in 143 in high-income countries.

Today, there is a 36-year gap in life expectancy between countries. A child born in Malawi can expect to live for 47 years while a child born in Japan could live for as long as 83 years. (1) In Chad, every fifth child dies before they reach the age of 5, while in the WHO European Region, the under-five mortality rate is 13 out of 1000. (2) There is no biological or genetic reason for these alarming differences in health and life opportunity.



Health Education and Training (HEAT) Programme

HEAT is health education and training programme, created by The UK Open University, and developed in partnership with African health experts, UNICEF, WHO and AMREF in response to the urgent need for education and training for frontline health workers.



Adolescent and Youth Reproductive Health
Antenatal Care
Communicable Diseases
Family Planning
Health Education, Advocacy and Community Mobilisation
Health Management, Ethics and Research
Hygiene and Environmental Health
Immunization
Integrated Management of Newborn and Childhood Illness
Labour and Delivery Care
Non-Communicable Diseases, Emergency Care and Mental Health
Nutrition
Postnatal Care

HEAT was launched in Ethiopia in 2011; the first thousand community health workers are coming to the end of their studies this year, and another 3,000 are joining the programme in 2013.

So what is HEAT, and how does it work?

At its simplest, HEAT is a scalable & sustainable training programme for healthcare workers that provides them with the training and expertise to save lives in their communities. The 13 theoretical training HEAT Modules were written by African authors, in collaboration with OU academics. They cover areas of healthcare including maternal, newborn and child health, family planning, nutrition, and communicable and non-communicable diseases, providing the healthcare workers with the knowledge they need to save lives in their communities. The theoretical training materials are available online (but can easily be downloaded and printed which is how they are being used in Ethiopia): http://www8.open.ac.uk/africa/heat/ (click on 'Resources' to see the materials).

All of the materials are published under an open educational resource licence so they are free to access, download, version and use, as long as the original authorship is acknowledged.

Where the theoretical training is supported and balanced by practical training, delivered by local experts, it can help to provide community health workers the essential practical skills that they need to become effective health carers.

We are currently talking with governments, NGOs and others in Tanzania, Zambia, Namibia, Nepal and elsewhere about using HEAT materials to help improve training programmes for frontline health workers.



PubMed Bookshelf provides free access to over 700 texts in life science and healthcare.'



Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health (PMNCH) Knowledge Summaries

Progress in women's and children's health depends on how efficiently knowledge on effective strategies and interventions can be translated into action. PMNCH Knowledge Summaries synthesize the scientific evidence in a short, user-friendly format to inform policy and practice, and can be a useful resource for policymakers, advocates, program managers and others. The Knowledge Summaries bring together information from trusted sources such as journal articles, systematic reviews, technical guidelines, policy documents etc., and each summary is peer-reviewed. We will provide links to new summaries as they are released.

Needs and Challenges: Women's and Children's Health: A Two-page Graphical and Geographical Summary of Needs and Challenges [Download (PDF)]

Additional resources: RMNCH essential packages ofinterventions by level and commodity requirements [High (PDF) – Low (PDF)]

Knowledge Summary 23:
Human Rights & Accountability
Knowledge Summary 23


Knowledge Summary 22:
Reaching Child Brides
Knowledge Summary 22


Knowledge Summary 21:
Strengthen National Financing
Knowledge Summary 21


Knowledge Summary 20:
Access to Family Planning
Knowledge Summary 20


Knowledge Summary 19:
Food Security and Climate Change
Knowledge Summary 19


Knowledge Summary 18:
Nutrition
Knowledge Summary 18


Knowledge Summary 17:
Civil Registration and Vital Statistics
Knowledge Summary 17


Knowledge Summary 16:
Parliamentarians
Knowledge Summary 16


Knowledge Summary 15:
Non-Communicable Diseases
Knowledge Summary 15


Knowledge Summary 14:
Save Lives: Invest in Midwives
Knowledge Summary 14


Knowledge Summary 13:
Make Stillbirths Count
Knowledge Summary 13


Knowledge Summary 12:
Deliver on Promises
Knowledge Summary 12


Knowledge Summary 11:
Engage across Sectors
Knowledge Summary 11


Knowledge Summary 10:
Foster Innovation
Knowledge Summary 10


Knowledge Summary 9:
Address Inequities
Knowledge Summary 9


Knowledge Summary 8:
Strive for Universal Access
Knowledge Summary 8


Knowledge Summary 7:
Assure Quality Care
Knowledge Summary 7


Knowledge Summary 6:
Support the Workforce
Knowledge Summary 6


Knowledge Summary 5:
Provide Essential Commodities
Knowledge Summary 5


Knowledge Summary 4:
Prioritize Proven Interventions
Knowledge Summary 4


Knowledge Summary 3:
Cost & Fund RMNCH programs
Knowledge Summary 3


Knowledge Summary 2:
Enable the Continuum of Care
Knowledge Summary 2


Knowledge Summary 1:
Understand the Burden
Knowledge Summary 1


*Compendium publication:
PMNCH Knowledge Summaries 1-12
Knowledge Summaries
*This is a practical document from PMNCH and the University of Aberdeen. It includes a collection of twelve Knowledge Summaries that focus on action. These constitute the first edition of PMNCH Knowledge Summaries, launched at the November 2010 Partners' Forum.
PMNCH Knowledge Summaries 1 to 12: Sharing Knowledge for Action on Maternal, Newborn and Child Health.
High (PDF) – Low (PDF)
Introduction and Acknowledgements [High (PDF) – Low(PDF)]


Repository on Maternal Child HealthThe 'Repository on Maternal Child Health' is a virtual guide to Child Health and related Maternal Health information relevant to Public Health in India. It is a one-stop access to efficiently search, organize and share latest information.

Topics / Themes: Maternal Health, Newborn and Child Health, Immunization, Nutrition, Diseases, General Information


United Nations Social Development Network (UNSDN)







United Nations Social Development Network (UNSDN) to share knowledge and good practices among social development professionals worldwide on ageing, civil society, cooperatives, disability, employment, family, indigenous peoples, poverty, social integration, technology and youth. UNSDN is also uniquely positioned to disseminate information and knowledge produced by the United Nations system in the area of social development, particularly on the three core issues of poverty eradication, employment generation and social integration. UNSDN will act as a major interface between DESA and its partners working in the areas of social development. DESA intends to strengthen its relationships with its partners involved in advancing the global social development agenda.

There is an increasing awareness that knowledge is central to all development efforts as it empowers social actors to find appropriate solutions to their own challenges. By sharing knowledge, the portal aims to assist Member States in the development of policies and practices that promote the goals of the World Summit for Social Development.



Taking care of a baby at home after birth: What families need to doTaking care of a baby at home after birth: What families need to do  Download pdf

This flipbook, released in Nov. 2011, contains key messages that pregnant women and their families need in order to plan care of an infant at home right after birth. It focuses on essential actions families can take both to prevent newborn death and illness and to promote healthy newborn development.

This material encourages use, whenever possible, of skilled birth attendants and clinical services and, where that is not realistic, provides some information on what families can do for pregnant women and care of the baby at birth.

Even where mothers deliver with a skilled birth attendant in a health facility, they are often sent home within 6-12 hours of delivery. This material can also be used with women going home soon after delivery in a health facility. It highlights danger signs in the infant that require immediate attention and referral.

This tool was developed by CORE Group, in collaboration with Save the Children, the American College of Nurse-Midwives, and MCHIP.

This material is meant for outreach to pregnant women and their families with poor access to health services. These communities may also have low-literacy levels and/or poor access to health information. It is important to test the material with outreach workers and community members to be sure the messages are understood and acceptable. For guidance on adapting or testing this material, please email contact@coregroupdc.org.

 

 

Sexual and reproductive health - Maternal and perinatal health - Publications

 

Managing newborn problems - a guide for doctors, nurses and midwives

 
Managing newborn problems: A guide for doctors, nurses and midwives

This guide, based on the latest available evidence, provides up-to-date, authoritative clinical guidelines that are relevant to a facility with basic laboratory facilities, selected essential drugs and supplies, and the capability to provide safe blood transfusion. In some settings, the guide will be relevant to large health centres that provide childbirth care and have the capacity to care for sick or small newborn babies.

More information/full text

Pregnancy, childbirth, postpartum and newborn care - a guide for essential practice

 

Pregnancy, childbirth, postpartum and newborn care - a guide for essential practice

Aimed at skilled attendants working at the primary health care level in settings with limited resources, this book provide guidance on how to deliver essential care to women (and their newborn) during pregnancy, childbirth and postnatal period (up to six weeks after delivery)

More information/full text
Français

Managing complications in pregnancy and childbirth: A guide for midwives and doctors

 

Managing complications in pregnancy and childbirth

A must for midwives and doctors at the district hospital who are responsible for the care of women with complications of pregnancy, childbirth or the immediate postpartum period, including immediate problems of the newborn. Both physicians and midwives will find this manual essential for promoting and assessing the quality of health services, in the training of providers and in supporting quality services through supervision and performance feed-back.

More information/full text
Español - Français

Sexually transmitted and other reproductive tract infections - A guide to essential practice

 

Sexually transmitted and other reproductive tract infections - A guide to essential practice

This publication is intended to assist health care managers and practitioners in resource-limited reproductive health care settings around the world to meet the needs of individuals who may be at risk of reproductive tract infections (RTIs).

It is assumed that readers are familiar with certain clinical knowledge, such as drugs and their dosages, although they may not have experience with management of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and RTIs.

More information/full text
Español - Français

Guidelines for the management of sexually transmitted infections

Guidelines for the management of sexually transmitted infections

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) remain a public health problem of major signifi cance in most parts of the world. The incidence of acute STIs is believed to be high in many countries. Failure to diagnose and treat STIs at an early stage may result in serious complications and sequelae, including infertility, fetal wastage, ectopic pregnancy, anogental cancer and premature death, as well as neonatal and infant infections. The individual and national expenditure on STI care can be substantial.

More information/full text
Español - Français - Portuguese



Indian Public Health Standard (IPHS) Guidelines 2012

The revised Indian Public Health Standard (IPHS) Guidelines 2012 have been released on the website of the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.

IPHS Guidelines for Sub-Centres Revised 2012 (1.7 mb)

IPHS Guidelines for Primary Health Centres Revised 2012 (1.2 mb)

IPHS Guidelines for Community Health Centres Revised 2012 (1.1 mb)

IPHS Guidelines for Sub-District/Sub-Divisional Hospitals (31 to 100 Bedded) Revised 2012 (1.7 mb)

IPHS Guidelines for District Hospitals (101 to 500 Bedded) Revised 2012 (1.76 mb)


Publications for patients / consumers in India

National AIDS Control Organisation

Voluntary Health Association of India

HELP - Health Education Library for People's collection

SEARCH (Society for Education, Action and Research in Community Health)
Training materials - Information brochures

Public Health Resources

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Open Courseware - Courses in public health open to all in areas such as Injury prevention, Environment, Public health preparedness, Mental health, Health policy. Each course offers syllabus outline, lecture materials with slides and audio, readings, assignments, and projects.

Health Manager's Toolkit
Provides a selection of tools for health professionals to offer high quality and sustainable health services. The tools are organised by subject area, which include Community health services, Drug and supply management, Health policy and reform, Monitoring and evaluation, etc. Each includes spreadsheet templates, forms for data gathering, checklists, guidelines, and self-assessment tools.

Demographic & Health Surveys (Measure DHS)
Provides a wide range of reliable health data for most African countries in which comparative tables can be compiled by country and by a number of important health indicators. Most countries now have several reports over a number of years.

The Lancet's Public Health Collection
A wide range of over 750 key articles from 2006 to present in public health focusing on low- and middle-income countries - most are available free, or otherwise available through Hinari. See also its Global Health Series.

Selected African Public Health Journals from African Index Medicus
See also the new, open access Journal of Public Health in Africa (http://www.publichealthinafrica.org/index.php/jphia)

The Trials Register of Promoting Health Interventions (TRoPHI)
A worldwide database of randomised and non-randomised interventions in health promotion and public health searchable by country, health focus, population group, intervention characteristics.

The WWWVirtual Library: Public Health (University of New South Wales, Australia)
Subject and geographical listings. See also: Health Information and Health Organizations on Africa (Columbia University)



 

World Health Statistics 2012

World Health Statistics 2012

World Health Statistics 2012 contains WHO's annual compilation of health-related data for its 194 Member States, and includes a summary of the progress made towards achieving the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and associated targets.

This year, it also includes highlight summaries on the topics of noncommunicable diseases, universal health coverage and civil registration coverage.

Progress on the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) Fact sheet N°290

Download the Summary Brochure - Available in 3 languages
English pdf, 381kb - French pdf, 389kb - Spanish pdf, 389kb

Download the Full Report - Available in 3 languages
English pdf, 2.47Mb - French pdf, 2.69Mb - Spanish pdf, 2.84Mb

Download the Report in English, by Section
Table of contents and introduction pdf, 144kb
Part I. Health-related Millennium Development Goals pdf, 437kb
Part II. Highlighted topics pdf, 253kb
Part III. Global health indicators pdf, 1.26Mb


 

Respectful Maternity Care: Every Childbearing Woman's Right  Download Poster pdf

In every country and community worldwide, pregnancy and childbirth are momentous events in the lives of women and families and represent a time of intense vulnerability. Imagine the personal treatment you would expect from a maternity care provider entrusted to help you or a woman you love give birth. Naturally, we envision a relationship characterized by caring, empathy, support, trust, confidence, and empowerment, as well as gentle, respectful, and effective communication to enable informed decision making.

Unfortunately, too many women experience care that does not match this image. Pregnant women seeking maternity care instead too often receive ill treatment that ranges from relatively subtle disrespect of their autonomy and dignity to outright abuse: physical assault, verbal insults, discrimination, abandonment, or detention in facilities for failure to pay. Disrespect and abuse of women during maternity care is a problem that has been obscured by a "veil of silence".

NO MORE.

Through the USAID Health Policy Project, partners from the research, educational, clinical, human rights, and global and national advocacy communities are working collaboratively to establish a growing community of concern determined to address the issue of disrespect and abuse during maternity care. This month we are pleased to launch the RESPECTFUL MATERNITY CARE CHARTER: THE UNIVERSAL RIGHTS OF CHILDBEARING WOMEN and new advocacy materials, based on this rights framework, that convey the message RESPECTFUL MATERNITY CARE is every woman's right.

Now we are calling on you to join us by learning more and engaging your communities to speak out and break the silence.


Useful links:
Respectful Maternity Care
Respectful Maternity Care Charter: the Universal Rights of Childbearing Women
Companion brochure  and Poster based on this rights framework.



Evaluation Study of National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) in 7 States
download study February 2011download pdf153 pages - 805 kb

It is an appraisal study of NRHM done by the Population Research Centre, Institute of Economic Growth to evaluate performance of NRHM in seven states of India viz. Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, Jharkhand, Orissa, Assam, Jammu and Kashmir and Tamil Nadu. The objective of the study is to evaluate and assess the availability, adequacy and utilization of health services in the rural areas, the role played by ASHAs, AYUSH in creating awareness of health, nutrition among the rural population and to identify the constraints and catalysts in the implementation of the NRHM programmes. Besides studying the utilization aspects of health services, other crucial factors like availability, planning and preparedness of health facilities and human resources, drugs availability, quality of MCH care and diagnostic-services, referral services, process of accreditation, effective decentralization, effective utilization of funds, etc. have also been studied. Simultaneous attention on programs impacting nutrition, capacity building, communitization, empowerment, etc. are equally important for effective utilization of the health.


Child mortality rate drops by a third since 1990 - UNICEF  •  Levels & Trends in Child Mortality - The Lancet
download report September 2011 download pdf24 pages - 3.6 mb
Report 2011 - Estimates Developed by the UN Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation

Only four years remain to achieve Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG 4), which calls for reducing the under-five mortality rate by twothirds between 1990 and 2015. Since 1990 the under-five mortality rate has dropped 35 percent, with every developing region seeing at least a 30 percent reduction. However, at the global level progress is behind schedule, and the target is at risk of being missed by 2015. The global underfive mortality rate needs to be halved from 57 deaths per 1,000 live births to 29—that implies an average rate of reduction of 13.5 percent a year, much higher than the 2.2 percent a year achieved between 1990 and 2010.



UN reports progress towards poverty alleviation, urges increased support for the poorest - Download pdf
7 July 2011 – Some of the world’s poorest countries have made impressive gains in the fight against poverty, but the least developed countries still lag in efforts to improve living standards, the United Nations said today in a report showing significant overall progress towards achieving the global targets against extreme poverty.

Giving examples of achievements, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) Report – prepared by the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) – says that Burundi, Rwanda, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Togo and Tanzania attained or are nearing the goal of universal primary education, one of the targets.


Eliminating health inequities - Every woman and every child counts  Download pdf
The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), in partnership with the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health

Health inequities are affecting the life and future of all vulnerable groups of society across the world, creating systems of social injustice. By dismantling the barriers to health services and resources, we reduce the burden of disease that affects the future of children, impoverishes entire families and passes social injustice on through the generations. In this report, we focus on women and children not only because many of them suffer undue hardship, but also because women are instrumental in improving the health of their children, families and communities.

This report provides evidence that health inequities can and need to be addressed through a holistic approach. Health inequities, and the resulting social injustice are closely linked with other issues such as poverty, gender inequality and human rights violations which in turn, have an impact on education, transport, health, agriculture, and overall well-being. Our interventions should therefore be multi-sectoral, going beyond health to address social and economic determinants - malnutrition, alcohol abuse, poor housing, indoor air pollution and poverty, among others.



Community Health Workers (CHW) CentralCommunity Health Workers (CHW) Central
An online resource for information and dialogue about Community Health Workers (CHW). CHWs play an important role in increasing access to health services in poor and underserved communities around the world. CHW Central supports community health workers and strengthens CHW programs by connectingexperts, practitioners, and supporters in interactive discussion forums and sharing the latest developments in CHW research, practice, and policy.


Health Workers Count: The World Needs More Health Workers, Better SupportedHealth Workers Count: The World Needs More Health Workers, Better Supported

No Child Out of Reach: Time to end the health worker crisis - Download pdf
 

The current shortage of over 3.5 million doctors, nurses, midwives and community health workers means that millions of children do not receive the health care they need, and risk an early death from preventable causes. We cannot achieve the goal of saving 15 million children’s lives by 2015 unless a health worker – with the right skills, equipment and support – is within reach of every child.

The new report sets out the scale and the causes of the crisis, and recommendations for how it can be overcome. Progress will require political action at the global level, backed by strong national efforts in every country with a critical shortage of health workers.

Increased long-term investment is needed to recruit and train more health workers, with a balance across different cadres. At the same time better use of the existing workforce must be made by ensuring they are equitably deployed, receive a fair living wage, and are well supported, trained, equipped and motivated. Tackling the health worker crisis will also require governments and donors to spend more, and spend more smartly, focusing on areas that will have the greatest impact on children’s health.

More Health Workers
The world is suffering from a massive gap of more than 3.5 million health workers. Join with hundreds of organisations who have already signed up to our urgent call for more health workers, better supported. click here

Scaling Up, Saving Lives - download pdf
Task Force for Scaling Up Education and Training for Health Workers, Global Health Workforce Alliance

Health workers are the cornerstone and drivers of health systems. And yet the world is facing a serious shortage of health workers – a shortage that is identified as one of the most critical constraints to the achievement of health and development goals.

This crisis is impairing the provision of essential, life-saving interventions such as childhood immunization, safe pregnancy and delivery services for mothers, and access to treatment for HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis.

New and innovative initiatives are urgently needed to increase the numbers of trained health workers. This requires scaling up investment in education, skill mix and remuneration of the workforce as laid out in the Kampala Declaration and Agenda for Global Action, endorsed in March 2008 at the First Global Forum on Human Resources for Health.



Infographic, World Health, GOOD, Transparency, Women's health, Infants, Babies Health

Infographic: How Community Health Workers Save Lives in the Developing World

Imagine if pregnant women and their kids in developing countries could be given simple, lifesaving health care, even when miles away from a hospital or doctor. Community health workers—trained practitioners who provide health care for pregnant women, assist in childbirth, and treat newborns—provide just that service. Without community health workers, pregnant women and newborn babies in the developing world are at risk for disease. More than 350,000 women die in childbirth and pregnancy each year, and almost 3.6 million babies die before they are a month old. Even small complications can be deadly for people living so far away from hospitals. Community health workers are saving lives by using a very basic—but very important—set of solutions and techniques.



Global strategy for women's and children's healthGlobal strategy for women's and children's health


Each year, millions of women and children die from preventable causes. These are not mere statistics. They are people with names and faces. Their suffering is unacceptable in the 21st century. We must, therefore, do more for the newborn who succumbs to infection for want of a simple injection, and for the young boy who will never reach his full potential because of malnutrition. We must do more for the teenage girl facing an unwanted pregnancy; for the married woman who has found she is infected with the HIV virus; and for the mother who faces complications in childbirth.  � more

UN launches $40bn woman and child health plan
The UN has launched a $40bn health initiative aimed at saving the lives of 16 million women and children over the next five years. About eight million under-fives die every year and more than a third of a million women lose their lives during pregnancy or childbirth.



Essential Health Links

This resource provides more than 750 useful websites for health professionals, medical library communities, publishers, and NGOs in developing and emerging countries.

Users should note that the compilers do not have sufficient resources to evaluate the scientific accuracy of each website that is included in Essential Health Links.



The Lancet Global Health Portal
The Lancet has a commitment to improving global health, and this area gathers all our global health content in one location. Global health content is free to all users, so if you have an interest in this area, spend some time browsing our content. World Reports and Perspectives articles are ideal for anyone who wants a personal view on a subject, and The Lancet Global Health Series, and Regional Reports and Commissions provide in-depth views for anyone seeking disease-specific or regional information.

Global Health Series
The Lancet Global Health Series are groups of articles on a topic of global health importance. Research into prevalent conditions and wider health policy issues are reported by a range of experts.  Recent Global Health Series include Obesityy, New Decade of Vaccines, and Chronic diseases and development.

Specialty Collections
The Lancet Global and Public Health Specialty Collections contain all public and global health Articles, Reviews, Seminars, and Comments for each specialty, published in all Lancet journals from 2006.  Browse the collections, or create alerts to receive email updates as soon as articles in your specialty are published.


Facts for LifeFacts for Life

Author: UNICEF, WHO, UNESCO, UNFPA, UNDP, UNAIDS, WFP and the World Bank
Publication date: April 2010
Languages: English French Spanish

The fourth edition of Facts for Life contains essential information that families and communities need to know to raise healthy children. This handbook provides practical advice on pregnancy, childbirth, childhood illnesses, child development and the care of children. This edition also features a new chapter on child protection. The book is intended for parents, families, health workers, teachers, youth groups, women’s groups, community organizations, government officials, employers, trade unions, media, and non-governmental and faith-based organizations.
 


Baby Massage DVDBaby Massage DVD
Hands to Hearts International’s Baby Massage DVD teaches basic baby massage strokes that not only make your little one happy but build loving bonds crucial to their development. When you purchase our Baby Massage DVD for yourself, or as a gift, you’re contributing to HHI’s work with orphaned and vulnerable children around India.

Benefits of Baby Massage:
* Reduces baby’s fussiness and crying
* Improves baby’s sleep
* Decreases constipation and colic
* Increases bond between parent and child
* Relaxing for baby and parent

Along with your DVD you’ll receive an instructional poster with pictures to guide your baby massage.
Cost: $25 USD, shipping included for a limited time. Order here.

* Filmed in India.  The DVD is available in English, with subtitles in the following 18 languages: Arabic, Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), Danish, Finnish, French, Hindi, Japanese, Oriya, Romanian, Russian, Slovenian, Spanish, Tamil, Telugu, Turkish, Ukrainian and Vietnamese.

Learn more about Hands to Hearts International at www.handstohearts.org



Why is breastfeeding so important?Why Is Breastfeeding So Important?
Why Is Breastfeeding So Important?Download .pdf 17.5 mb.

Breastfeeding provides the perfect nutrition for your baby and provides many health benefits for both mother and baby.
- Initiating breast feeding within the first hour and exclusive breastfeeding can prevent under two mortality.
- Breastfeeding: Exclusive breastfeeding
- Colostrum - Gift of a protective cover from the mother
- We believe all mothers know how to feed their child. But do they?
- Myths and facts about breast milk
- Complimentary feeding
- Role of media in promoting proper young child feeding: Media should focus on and promote measures that are required to be taken urgently to ensure the survival of children


 

2011 Human Development Report

2011 Human Development ReportSustainability and Equity: A Better Future for All
The 2011 Report argues that environmental sustainability can be most fairly and effectively achieved by addressing health, education, income, and gender disparities together with the need for global action on energy production and ecosystem protection.Download the report  |  Norway at top, DR Congo last  |  Download index





Institute for Reproductive Health at Georgetown UniversityInstitute for Reproductive Health at Georgetown University


Since its founding in 1985, IRH has been recognized as a leader in the effort to improve reproductive health worldwide. The Institute’s strengths are its quantitative and qualitative research skills, its focus on critical needs in reproductive health, and its research-to-practice strategy that includes working with partners to build capacity for sustainable services. The Institute collaborates with a wide variety of organizations from central to community levels to implement evidence-based service delivery programs in countries worldwide.



WHO - The Health Academy's goal is to improve knowledge about attaining and maintaining good health. Through eLearning – which is how WHO defines learning by any electronic technology and media – the Organization has the means to reach out to people with information on disease prevention and health promotion. What is particularly important is the ability to reach school-age children, those aged from 12-18 years.

WHO is in a unique position to provide this information with its access to health expertise and rich information resources including those from its 193 Member States.


Knowledge Management for Health and Development eToolkit

The KM toolkit brings together a wealth of KM resources from the field of international public health and development that are applicable to the field or can be adapted. The toolkit is structured to encompass all the levels of program planning and implementation for a KM strategy from the elevator pitch to monitoring and evaluation, with links to prominent KM resources and websites.

The toolkit is a product of the Knowledge Management Working Group which is comprised of C-Change, Child Fund International, Core Group, FHI 360, Institute for Reproductive Health: Georgetown University, IntraHealth International, the K4Health project, University Research Co, LLC, US Agency for International Development (USAID) and the USAID Policy Institute and WHO Department of Reproductive Health (RHR).


Eldis aims to share the best in development, policy, practice and research. Eldis is one of a family of knowledge services from the Institute of Development Studies, Sussex.  Eldis is funded by UKaid and Irish Aid.
  • 26,000 full text documents free to download
    We maintain an ever-growing collection of editorially selected and abstracted full-text, online documents selected by our editors from more than 7,500 different publishers. All documents are available free of charge
  • Eldis resource guides
    Our 24 subject-focused guides offer quick access to key documents, organisations, research themes, discussions and other key resources
  • Eldis country profiles 
    Quick access to our database arranged by country, plus quick links to country briefing services on other websites
  • Eldis email newsletters
    Our email news services bring the latest research to your mail-box on 35 topics
  • Eldis newsfeeds
    Add an Eldis RSS newsfeed to your website or newsreader for the latest information on 25 topics

Resource guides provide quick access to research on major policy and research issues

Dossiers are narrative in format giving the context to an issue with case studies and further reading

Ageing populationsAgriculture  AidChildren and young peopleClimate changeConflict and securityCorporate responsibilityEducationEnvironmentFinance policyFood securityGenderGlobalisationGovernanceGovernance assessmentsHIV and AIDSHealth and fragile statesHealth challengesHealth systemsHuman resources for healthICT for developmentInfluencing policyLivelihoodsConnectManuals and toolkitsMeeting the health-related needs of the very poorMigrationOpen Access for developmentParticipationPovertyTrade and genderTrade policyTrafficking in women and childrenWTO Doha Round



Healthy Child Uganda (HCU) is a partnership between Ugandan and Canadian universities with active participation by local Ugandan communities. The Ugandan partners are Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST), Mbarara and Bushenyi Health Districts; the Canadian partners are the University of Calgary, Dalhousie University, and the Canadian Paediatric Society. These groups share a common goal of improving child health in rural southwestern Uganda.

HCU develops and evaluates programs and provides training so Ugandan health care staff, community health workers, and parents themselves are better able to prevent child deaths and keep their children healthy.

Child health is a challenge in rural Uganda. Nearly one in five children die before their fifth birthday when almost all child deaths could be prevented using simple, inexpensive solutions.

Training Manuals



ELD Training provides practical training and consultancy services to development organisations worldwide. Active since 2000 in South and South-East Asia, ELD services are now available to development partners throughout Asia and Africa.

Current ELD initiatives currently include:


Good health at low cost - 25 years on. What Makes a successful health system?
Editors: Dina Balabanova; Martin McKee; Anne Mills - London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine LSHTM - 2011
full book PDFdownload pdf - 399 pages 5.6Mb | mirror copy

'Why do some low and middle income countries manage to achieve good health outcomes while others fail? What factors drive improvements in the health system and in access to primary health care? How can we act on the social determinants of health in cash-strapped economies?

These questions are as relevant today as they were in 1985 when the Rockefeller Foundation published what was to become a seminal report - Good health at low cost. The report explored why some low and middle income countries achieved better health outcomes than others, making Good health at low cost essential reading for health systems decision- and policy-makers alike.

This new edition of Good health at low cost 25 years on draws on a series of new case studies from Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Kyrgyzstan, Tamil Nadu and Thailand providing fresh insights into the role of effective institutions, innovation and country ownership in catalysing improvements in health.

New challenges such as increasing urbanisation, a growing private sector and an upsurge in non-communicable diseases suggest that both learning from the past and new thinking are required to strengthen health systems. This edition provides both and is a vital resource for academics, policy-makers and practitioners grappling with how to improve health in low and middle income countries..'

The authors emphasise the need for a 'systems thinking approach that understands the relationships between different health system components, the context in which the systems exist, and the sequencing of actions'. In their conclusion, the authors say: 'The key message of this book is that success in improving health and delivering health care is facilitated by capacity, both individual and institutional, continuity, or the ability to maintain a course even when all around is changing, catalysts, or the ability to seize windows of opportunity, and sensitivity to context, so that policies that are adopted take account of the circumstances in which they will be implemented'. Their 'Pathways to Improving Health and Access to Care' include 'Political commitment... Collaboration... Flexible use of health workers... Building health system resilience... Economic factors... Social development'.



The Haiti Relief Toolkit is a one-stop source for technical and practical information that will help health workers, health policy makers, program managers, and others respond to the earthquake relief efforts underway in Haiti. The toolkit covers the vital sectors in emergencies, including health, water and sanitation, food security, and shelter.

(For those who do not have Internet access or whose access is sporadic, K4Health is making the toolkit available on flash drives. To request the toolkit on flash drive, contact K4Health by e-mail at toolkit orders@k4health.org ; by phone at 1-410-659-6300; or by mail at K4Health Project, 111 Market Place, Suite 310, Baltimore, MD 21202, USA)

Over 65 publishers have resources in this toolkit. The resources include manuals, reference tables, checklists, briefs, pamphlets, posters, and teaching and training materials, and tools and job aids. Feel free to adapt them for your local circumstances and languages. If you would like to suggest resources, please use the discussion board link.

To browse the contents of the toolkit, use the navigation tabs above. You can also use the Quick Links on this page to access key information quickly on such topics as Girls and Women, Children and Youth, and People with Disabilities. Under the healthcare tab you can find resources on Cholera, Dental Care, Gender, Health Systems Strengthening, Heat Related Illness, Infectious Diseases, Reproductive Health, Vaccination, Violence Prevention, and more.

Another quick way to find all the resources on a particular topic is to use the search box at the top of any page. For example, if you type in “Cholera” you will see a list of results, including a comprehensive and easy to use Fact Sheet from PAHO/WHO on how to prevent, identify, and treat the disease.

For more detailed information about the Haiti Relief Toolkit, use the About link at top of this page.


Films for women in the community, community workers and health workers
 

Medical Aid Films (MAF - MedicalAidFilms.org) is a cutting edge film-making charity. We produce training films and animations for grassroots health workers in low income countries. Our films provide information and medical techniques on issues surrounding safe childbirth and infant health, with the aim of saving the lives of vulnerable women and children around the world.

Approximately one woman a minute dies in childbirth. We hope that by using film and animation to train health workers, we can overcome literacy and language barriers that so often impede learning.

 

Warning Signs in Pregnancy

This film is aimed at community health workers, traditional birth attendants and women in the community.

Its objective is to educate them about the warning signs in pregnancy that they should be aware of, and the checks they should carry out, so that skilled obstetric care can be sought out as soon as possible in order to save mother and child. © Medical Aid Films - 2011

Reconnaitre les signaux d'alerte durant la grossesse
Ce film s'adresse aux femmes, aux travailleurs communautaires en santé, aux sages-femmes traditionnelles et aux communautés en général.

Il a pour but de leur enseigner les signaux d'alerte lors de la grossesse ainsi que les signes à rechercher, afin que les femmes enceintes qui les présentent reçoivent, au plus tôt, des soins obstétriques dispensés par du personnel qualifié. © Medical Aid Films - 2011

 

Neonatal Resuscitation - Skilled Health Worker Version

This teaching film is aimed at skilled health workers equipped with a stethoscope and a bag and a mask. It teaches the essential steps to perform Neonatal Resuscitation, based on the Resuscitation Council UK's guidelines. © Medical Aid Films - 2011
 

Understanding your body: How to plan a pregnancy

This film is aimed at teenagers and young adults and presents the various methods available to plan a pregnancy. © Medical Aid Films - 2011
 

Understanding your body: How babies are made

This is a film aimed at early teens and young adults. It describes what puberty is and how babies are made using a mixture of animation and expert advice as well as from vox-pop's from young men and women in Nairobi. © Medical Aid Films - 2011
 

How to use the ultrasound probe

This animation is part of Basic Obstetric Ultrasound Module. Films of this module are to be used when training midwives and clinical officers in basic obstetric ultrasound.

MAF tested this film while training clinical officers and nurses in Mozambique.

Very few people living in low resource areas of the world have any access to obstetric ultrasound. However, on-going studies show that at risk pregnancies can be highlighted and appropriate and timely referral of women can have an impact on the morbidity and mortality rate of women in these countries.

Learning the orientation of the probe is considered to be the most challenging part of learning to scan. This animation is used in conjunction with other formal training to improve the proficiency, uptake and understanding of scanning. © Medical Aid Films - 2011 
 

Cervical cancer screening: visual inspection of the cervix using acetic acid (VIA)

This is an animation showing a method of screening for cervical cancer in resource poor, developing countries.

Test such as the pap smear require access to skilled health care and labs for testing samples and HPV (the virus responsible for most cervical cancers) testing kits remain expensive, yet VIA offers a low cost alternative which can be performed with minimal resources.

VIA stands for Visual Inspection of the cervix with Acetic acid. © Medical Aid Films - 2011 
 

Ten steps to safe delivery

This follows Neema a village birth attendant while she helps to deliver a baby in a rural setting where there is no access to trained health care workers. The 10 key steps for the audience to learn are then repeated at the end of the film to ensure that they are taking away the correct message. © Medical Aid Films - 2011
 

Management of PPH - Low resource setting

This animation is aimed at women and TBAs. It teaches how to prevent and manage PPH in settings where skilled obstetric care can be reached within a reasonable period of time (less than four hours). It includes the use of Misoprostol. © Medical Aid Films - 2011
 

Management of PPH - No resource setting

Primary Post-partum Haemorrhage (PPH) is one of the major causes of maternal death in the developing world. This animation is aimed at women and TBAs.

It teaches how to prevent and manage PPH in settings where it would take the woman more than 4 hours to reach skilled obstetric care. It demonstrates the use of Misoprostol as well as internal bimanual compression.

This animation has no voice-over. © Medical Aid Films - 2011
 

Food for Life: What Pregnant Women Need to Eat

Ce que doivent manger les femmes enceintes
Ce film s'adresse aux femmes, aux travailleurs en santé et aux communautés en général.

Il leur enseigne les bases de l'alimentation que doit consommer une femme enceinte ainsi que les complications qu'une alimentation saine permet d'éviter. Il présente les quatre groupes d'aliments (les aliments de base, les aliments pour bouger, les aliments pour grandir et les aliments bonne mine) et détaille leurs bienfaits. © Medical Aid Films - 2011
 

Food for life: What and when to feed you child?

Quand et comment nourrir votre enfant - 6 à 24 mois
Ce film s'adresse aux femmes, aux travailleurs en santé et aux communautés en général.

Il leur enseigne les bases de l'alimentation d'un enfant entre les âges de 6 mois et deux ans. Il présente les quatre grandes catégories d'aliments (les aliments de base, les aliments pour bouger, les aliments pour grandir et les aliments pour avoir bonne mine) et détaille leurs bienfaits. © Medical Aid Films - 2011

 

Food for life: Breastfeeding

Allaitement maternel - 0 à 6 mois
Ce film s'adresse aux mères, aux travailleurs en santé et aux communautés en général.

Il leur enseigne pourquoi et comment allaiter un nourrisson de la naissance à l'âge de 6 mois. Il explique les avantages du lait maternel sur le lait artificiel, rappelle qu'il ne faut donner ni eau, ni tisane ni alimentation complémentaire aux bébés avant l'âge de 6 mois et démontre comment allaiter. © Medical Aid Films - 2011
 

The Story of MAF

With experts in the field of Obstetrics, Gynaecology, Midwifery and Paediatrics as founders and trustees of MAF our focus lies on improving the conditions for mothers, infants and children in the developing world who have little or no access to essential health care. © Medical Aid Films - 2011
 

MAF: How we work

The growth in mobile technologies across the developing world allows us to blend the inspirational skills of media and medical professionals together to produce our medical aid films. These films focus on bringing education and knowledge to the people that need it the most, including health providers. © Medical Aid Films - 2011
 



Tanzanian lessons in using non-physician clinicians to scale up comprehensive emergency obstetric care in remote and rural areas
by Angelo S Nyamtema, Senga K Pemba, Godfrey Mbaruku et al.
Human Resources for Health 2011, 9:28 (9 November 2011) 26 pp. 537 kB:
http://www.human-resources-health.com/content/pdf/1478-4491-9-28.pdf

A new study from Tanzania has shown that 'Tanzanian assistant medical officers, clinical officers, and nurse-midwives can be trained as a team, in a three-month course, to provide effective comprehensive emergency obstetrical care and anaesthesia in remote health centres'.

'In Tanzania, 47% of pregnant women deliver in health facilities and only 46% of deliveries are assisted by skilled personnel. The met need for emergency obstetric care, at 15-30%, and the caesarean section rate (CSR) of 3% are still below ideal levels and constitute the lowest rates in the world... Considering that most Sub-Saharan countries are already off-track in their attempts to achieve the MDGs for maternal and perinatal survival, evidence resulting from the current training programmes calls for urgency to scale up the application of the concept of 'task shifting' with the use of NPCs for CEmOC services provision and anaesthesia.'



Breastfeeding Gateway


 

CDC-- Newly Revised Health Communicator's Social Media Toolkit
downloaddownload pdfpdf  

"...The Health Communicator's Social Media Toolkit, originally released in September 2010, is a resource designed to provide partners with guidance and to share CDC's lessons learned in integrating social media into health campaigns.

The second edition is now available with additional information on developing trends in social media, best practices and a campaign example highlighting Vital Signs, a monthly program that focuses on a single, important health topic that provides a "call to action" for different audiences. Updated information includes the following:
  • Expanded Mobile Health section including information on mobile websites, downloadable applications and SMS text messaging.
  • Increased capabilities of Twitter to include Twitter Chats, Twitterviews, and Twitter Town Halls.
  • Enhanced best practices insight for Facebook, Twitter and Blogs.

Table of Contents

Social Media Introduction
Social Media Overview
Getting Your Feet Wet With Social Media
CDC's Top Lessons Learned from Using Social Media
Developing a Social Media Strategy
Social Media Monitoring and Evaluation
Governing Social Media Efforts
Social Media Tools
Buttons and Badges
Image Sharing
Content Syndication
RSS Feeds
Podcasts
Online Video Sharing
Widgets
eCards
Mobile Technologies
Twitter
Blogs
Facebook
Social Media Campaign Example
CDC Vital Signs Campaign
More Social Media Resources
Social Media Communications Strategy Worksheet
Social Media Evaluation Worksheet
References



Ministère de la Santé et de la Qualité de la Vie, Health IEC Unit, Republique de Maurice
Health Information, Education and Communication Unit at the Ministry of Health and Quality of Life, Mauritius


The following pamphlets on Diabetes, Obesity, Healthy Nutrition, Alcohol abuse and Cigarette smoking are in French. For each topic, there is a recto (front) and verso (back) file. You just have to fix the recto on the verso (back to back), fold it into three and you get your pamphlet.
All document are in pdf download pdfformat

L´ALCOOL source de vos problemes  -  Alcohol Abuse : Recto/FrontVerso/Back
LE DIABETE  -  Diabetes : Recto/FrontVerso/Back
DITES NON à la cigarette  -  Cigarette Smoking : Recto/Front  |  Verso/Back
L´OBÉSITÉ  -  Obesity : Recto/Front  |  Verso/Back
REPAS VARIÉES pour les diabétiques et pour tous  -  Healthy Nutrition : Recto/Front  |  Verso/Back



The Right to Information Act India - The Right to Information Act is an act to provide for setting out the practical regime of right to information for citizens to secure access to information under the control of public authorities, in order to promote transparency and accountability in the working of every public authority, the constitution of a Central Information Commission and State Information Commissions and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto. The Government of India enacted the RTI Act 2005, which came into effect on 12th October 2005.


Pocket book of hospital care for children: Second edition Pocket book of hospital care for children: Second edition

This is a pocket-sized manual for use by doctors, senior nurses and other senior health workers who are responsible for the care of young children at the first referral level in developing countries. It presents up-to-date clinical guidelines which are based on a review of the available published evidence by subject experts, for both inpatient and outpatient care in small hospitals where basic laboratory facilities and essential drugs and inexpensive medicines are available. It focuses on the inpatient management of the major causes of childhood mortality, such as pneumonia, diarrhoea, severe malnutrition, malaria, meningitis, measles, HIV infection and related conditions. It covers neonatal problems and surgical conditions of children which can be managed in small hospitals. This pocket book is part of a series of documents and tools that support the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI).

Whereas this manual focuses on treatment recommendations, a summary of the technical background and the evidence base underlying these clinical guidelines is presented in the background book Serious childhood problems in countries with limited resources (ISBN 29 4 156269 2).

This pocket book updates and expands the guidelines contained in Management of the child with a serious infection or severe malnutrition (WHO/FCH/CAH/00.1).



Manuals & Books from Maternal & Childhealth Advocacy International

EMNCH Manual (part of our Strengthening Emergency Care programme - SEC)
Emergency Maternal, Neonatal & Child Healthcare Manual. Available in English and Spanish.
Click here to view the downloads for the EMNCH manual in English
Click here to view the downloads for the EMNCH manual in Spanish
If you would like to purchase this manual please contact the office on +44 (0)115 950 6662 

Pocket Book of Obstetric, Neonatal and Paediatric Emergencies including Major Trauma (part of our Strengthening Emergency Care programme - SEC)
In collaboration with the Government of the Gambia and WHO the Gambia. Available in English and Spanish.
Pocket Book of Obstetric, Neonatal and Paediatric Emergencies including Major Trauma (PDF, 6.69MB), Last updated June 2011
Manual de bolsillo de emergencias en obstetricia, pediatr�a y neonatolog�a incluyendo trauma mayor (PDF, 4.5MB), Last updated May 2010

Pictorial Manual for traditional birth attendants (part of our Strengthening Emergency Care programme - SEC)
Pictorial manual for traditional birth attendants (PDF, 4.47MB)

Pictorial Manual for village health workers (part of our Strengthening Emergency Care programme - SEC)
Pictorial manual for village health workers (PDF, 4.28MB)

International Child Health Care - A Practical Manual for Hospitals Worldwide
This manual contains information, guidelines and suggestions about health care in virtually every situation and setting imaginable - peace and war, emergency and chronic, hospital and clinic. The advice is up to date and authoritative. It aims to be realistic, but at the same time does not compromise on standards. The authors believe that the health care professions around the world should be satisfied only with the best care for children.
Southall D, Coulter B, Ronald C, Parkes S, Nicholson S. - Published by British Medical Journal Books November 2001. (BOOK).
Click here to view the downloads for the International Child Health Care manual
Read the BMJ review of this book
How to order this book

MCAI'S Manual on Child Protection for health workers to use in poorly resourced countries
This manual addresses the recognition and diagnosis of child physical and sexual abuse. It provides an evidence-based assessment suitable for doctors and other senior health workers caring for children of all ages presenting with symptoms or signs that might be due to abuse. If you would like a copy of the manual, please email the following address and include in the email evidence of your professional qualifications and your postal address so that we can send it to you as a hard copy: director@mcai.org.uk

Pocket Emergency Paediatric Care
Pocket Emergency Paediatric Care - A Practical Guide to the Diagnosis and Management of Paediatric Emergencies in hospitals and other healthcare facilities worldwide
Southall D and Ahmad S. - British Medical Journal Books. 2003. (BOOK).
How to order this book

Refugee health: an approach to emergency situations
Ronald C, Southall D. - BMJ. 1999:318;200A. (BOOK REVIEW)
Read the BMJ review of this book

Parent held child health record & advice booklet
Created by MCAI with UNICEF in 1998 for use in the refugee and IDP (internally displaced person) camps in Bosnia during the 1990s conflict
Parent held child health record & advice booklet (PDF, 331 KB)
To read more about this please see McMaster P, McMaster H, Southall D P., 'Personal child health record & advice booklet programme in Tuzla, Bosnia Herzegovnia', Royal Society of Medicine. 1996:89:202-204

Step-by-step procedures for emergency healthcare

Pathways of Emergency Care in pregnancy and childbirth, in the newborn and older child - November 2008
These pathways of care can be copied and used free of charge in poorly resourced countries. They are copyrighted to ALSG and MCAI and must not be altered or sold. We kindly request that any use of these by well resourced countries is accompanied by a donation to ALSG and MCAI's Strengthening Emergency Care programme (SEC)   (read more...)

Visio-Acute renal failure in a child (PDF, 32KB)
Visio-Acute upper airway obstruction in a child (PDF, 38KB)
Visio-Anaphylaxis in a child (PDF, 30KB)
Visio-Anaphylaxis in pregnancy (PDF, 31KB)
Visio-Antepartum haemorrhage (PDF, 38KB)
Visio-Basic Life Support in a child (PDF, 33KB)
Visio-Basic Life Support in pregnancy (PDF, 33KB)
Visio-Burns in a child (PDF, 64KB)
Visio-Burns in pregnancy (PDF. 38KB)
Visio-Coma in a child (PDF, 39KB)
Visio-Coma in pregnancy (PDF, 30KB)
Visio-Envenomation (PDF, 37KB)
Visio-Failed intubation (PDF, 29KB)
Visio-Newborn resuscitation (PDF, 32KB)
Visio-Obstructed labour (PDF, 30KB)
Visio-Poisoning in a child (PDF, 34KB)
Visio-Poisoning in pregnancy (PDF, 35KB)
Visio-Postpartum haemorrhage (PDF, 38KB)
Visio-Prolapsed cord (PDF, 29KB)
Visio-Prolonged fitting in a child (PDF, 36KB)
Visio-Prolonged fitting in neonates (PDF, 36KB)
Visio-Severe asthma in a child (PDF, 43KB)
Visio-Severe asthma in pregnancy (PDF, 35KB)
Visio-Severe dehydration in pregnancy (PDF, 38KB)
Visio-Severe DKA in a child (PDF, 41KB)
Visio-Severe DKA in pregnancy (PDF, 45KB)
Visio-Severe hyperkalaemia in a child (PDF, 31KB)
Visio-Severe hypokalaemia in a child (K<2.5mmol/l) (PDF, 33KB)
Visio-Severe hypokalaemia in pregnancy (PDF, 24KB)
Visio-Shock in a child (PDF, 39KB)
Visio-Shock in pregnancy (PDF, 35KB)
Visio-Trauma in a child (PDF, 35KB)
Visio-Trauma in a mother (PDF, 38KB)
Visio-Trauma secondary survey (PDF, 33KB)
Visio-Uterine inversion (PDF, 30KB)



Global Health eLearning Center

The Global Health eLearning Center developed by the USAID Bureau of Global Health is a response to repeated requests from field staff for access to technical public health information. We have heard from USAID Population, Health, and Nutrition officers (PHNs) and from Foreign Service Nationals (FSNs) that they want to be current on global health topics, yet find it a challenge to obtain the information because of logistical and time constraints. The Global Health eLearning Center provides Internet-based courses that:
  • Provide useful and timely continuing education for health professionals
  • Offer state-of-the-art technical content on key public health topics
  • Serve as a practical resource for increasing public health knowledge


 


 

The State of the World's Midwifery Report 2011
Increasing women's access to quality midwifery has become a focus of global efforts to realize the right of every woman to the best possible health care during pregnancy and childbirth. A first step is assessing the situation.

The State of World's Midwifery 2011: Delivering Health, Saving Lives, supported by 30 partners, provides the first comprehensive analysis of midwifery services and issues in countries where the needs are greatest.

The report provides new information and data gathered from 58 countries in all regions of the world. Its analysis confirms that the world lacks some 350,000 skilled midwives -- 112,000 in the neediest 38 countries surveyed -- to fully meet the needs of women around the world. The report explores a range of issues related to building up this key health workforce.

 

GAVI Alliance: Saving children's lives and protecting people's health by increasing access to immunisation in poor countries - With GAVI Alliance support, developing countries are making important progress in introducing life-saving vaccines faster than ever before.


Doctoral Midwifery Research Society
The main objective of the DMRS is to provide quality support and guidance to doctoral and post doctoral midwife and childbirth (or related) researchers regionally, nationally and internationally. The DMRS places a strong emphasis on doing and using research for the good of society and for the advancement of knowledge for childbirth practices.


 

Supercourse is a repository of lectures on global health and prevention designed to improve the teaching of prevention. Supercourse has a network of over 56000 scientists in 174 countries who are sharing for free a library of 4855 lectures in 31 languages. The Supercourse has been produced at the WHO Collaborating Center University of Pittsburgh

What is Nursing Supercourse:

Nursing Supercourse is a global network of nurses. We aim to improve global health and prevention through collaboration. Nursing students are not getting adequate training in global health. We can change that by sharing lectures that are evidence based and up-to-date. Our lectures are driven by the global health trends.



Sharing in Health

Sharing In Health (SiH) is a website dedicated to addressing the shortage of primary health care providers in resource-poor settings through open-access training resources, designed for small-group learning and accessed through low-cost computers.

Built by students, for students, it depends on a global community to accomplish our goal of increasing global training capacity. This, we hope, will decrease the health care provider deficit, especially for primary care and public health in low-resourced areas.


Resources
 

Clinical Domains

Skills and Roles


 

Strategising online activism: a toolkit

This toolkit is published by Association for Progressive Communication Women’s Networking Support Programme and Violence is Not Our Culture (VNC). It was inspired by workshops held in Asia and Africa for the partners and members of the VNC campaign. It can also be a resource for human rights activists who are keen to develop their online activism and want to know where and how to to start.

It is intended to provide the following skills to campaigners:

  • An understanding of why and how information and communication technologies (ICTs) can be appropriated by women’s rights and human rights groups in their advocacy skills through their use of online tools, including networking and mobile tools for advocacy and campaigning
  • The ability to develop an advocacy / communication strategy
  • Knowing what social networking is and the various spaces and tools they could use in their online activism
  • An understanding of online privacy and security issues relevant to building their online activism.

Download Toolkit PDF



EBW Healthcare series

Adult HIV, Birth Defects, Child Healthcare, Childhood HIV, Childhood TB, Intrapartum Care, Maternal Care, Mother and Baby Friendly Care, Newborn Care, Newborn Care, Perinatal HIV, Primary Maternal Care, Primary Newborn Care, Saving Mothers and BabiesEBW Healthcare publishes an innovative series of distance-learning books for healthcare professionals, developed by the Perinatal Education Trust, Eduhealthcare, the Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation and the Desmond Tutu TB Centre, with contributions from numerous experts.

Adult HIV, Birth Defects, Child Healthcare, Childhood HIV, Childhood TB, Intrapartum Care, Maternal Care, Mother and Baby Friendly Care, Newborn Care, Newborn Care, Perinatal HIV, Primary Maternal Care, Primary Newborn Care, Saving Mothers and Babies

The aim is to provide appropriate, affordable and up-to-date learning material for healthcare workers in under-resourced areas, so that they can manage their own continuing education courses which will enable them to learn, practise and deliver skillful, efficient patient care.

>> more

 

Cartograms - Images of the social and economic world Cartograms - Images of the Social and Economic World

On a regular map, the sizes of the countries of the world are in proportion to their actual sizes on the surface of the planet and their shapes are the same as their actual shapes. Here are redrawn maps with the sizes of countries made bigger or smaller in order to represent something of interest. Such maps are called cartograms and can be an effective and natural way of portraying geographic or social data. Here are some examples of Population, Gross domestic product, Child mortality, People living with HIV/AIDS, Total spending on healthcare, Energy consumption (including oil), and Greenhouse gas emissions.


Diarrhoea: Why children are still dying and what can be done

Diarrhoea : Why children are still dying and what can be done

14 October, 2009 - New UNICEF/WHO Report Focuses Attention on Diarrheal Disease—the Second Leading Killer of Children Under 5—and Outlines 7-point Plan to Control This Preventable and Treatable Illness

The report highlights the proven diarrheal disease prevention and treatment solutions already available today. Many children in the developing world cannot access urgent medical care for severe illnesses, making prevention methods—including improved hygiene, sanitation, safe drinking water, exclusive breastfeeding, and vaccines preventing rotavirus—critical components of diarrheal disease control. When diarrhea occurs, it can be effectively treated with simple solutions, including oral rehydration therapy/oral rehydration solution, zinc and other micronutrients, and continued feeding.

Read more



Doctors For You

(DFY) is a medical humanitarian organization created by doctors, medical students & like minded people in Mumbai, India in 2007. They provide assistance to vulnerable communities in both crisis and non-crisis situations.

Today, DFY is working on various projects in more than 6 states of India with the help of more than 500 doctors and youths. They work for efficient, effective and equitable distribution of health care in India. In 2010, DFY received the SAARC Award for outstanding contribution to humanitarian works in the aftermath of natural disasters.



Computers for Beginners/Internet

Training and tutorial Internet sites for health workers

How to evaluate an Internet-based information source [Article]
BIOME, [2005] p 7-19

The Millennium Development Goals report 2006 [Report]
United Nations, 2006



 

Initiation of Breastfeeding by Breast Crawl Breast Crawl


Initiation of Breastfeeding by Breast Crawl


visit breastcrawl.org for video and complete dossier.



UNICEF, WHO and WABA along with the scientific community strongly recommend initiating breastfeeding within an hour of birth.
 
Evidence shows that early initiation can prevent 22% of all deaths among babies below one month in developing countries.

Every newborn, when placed on the mother’s abdomen, soon after birth, has the ability to find its mother’s breast all on its own and to decide when to take the first breastfeed. This is called the ‘Breast Crawl’.

This method is evidence based and has been field tested by us. A documentary on the ‘Breast Crawl’ has been prepared for training, advocacy and for wider dissemination. The video has created a very high level of sensitivity among all the levels of functionaries and was officially endorsed by senior policy makers as the right approach for initiating breastfeeding. This dossier provides the background and a scientific overview to the documentary.

Initiation of breastfeeding by the Breast Crawl is a critical component of the IYCF (Infant and Young Child Feeding) initiative for the state of Maharashtra, India. IYCF deals with nutrition of children from birth to 3 years of age, and also takes into consideration the nutrition of pregnant and lactating mothers. Two critical components of IYCF are breastfeeding and complementary feeding. Improved IYCF practices promote optimal growth and development, prevent malnutrition and improve child survival. With 40% of the children in the state undernourished, this initiative becomes extremely critical.

UNICEF has facilitated partnerships with all stakeholders including the State Government, State Nutrition Mission, the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS), Public Health Department, BPNI (Breastfeeding Promotion Network of India), NGOs, Community Based Organisations (CBOs) and several academic institutions, for this major initiative. These partnerships are aimed at creating a revolution in the state promoting IYCF practices.

We are sure that this documentary and dossier will greatly help similar initiatives worldwide. It is our strong desire that this information helps every mother and baby to experience the miracle of Breast Crawl. If we all could achieve early initiation of breastfeeding, we will be able to prevent 22% of all deaths among babies below 1 month.

This can be achieved by training all health care providers to initiate breastfeeding, by Breast Crawl, to give infants the best start in life.


visit breastcrawl.org for video and complete dossier.



Neonatal Mortality Levels for 193 Countries in 2009 with Trends since 1990: A Systematic Analysis of Progress, Projections, and Priorities
Historically, the main focus of studies of childhood mortality has been the infant and under-five mortality rates. Neonatal mortality (deaths <28 days of age) has received limited attention, although such deaths account for about 41% of all child deaths. To better assess progress, we developed annual estimates for neonatal mortality rates (NMRs) and neonatal deaths for 193 countries for the period 1990–2009 with forecasts into the future.  Download pdf


Priority Medicines for Mothers and Children 2011  download pdf

Improving maternal and child health is a global priority. An estimated 8.1 million children under the age of five die every year and an estimated 1 000 women – most of them in developing countries – die every day due to complications during pregnancy or childbirth.

Many of these deaths are due to conditions that could be prevented or treated with access to simple, affordable medicines. However, the availability of medicines at public-health facilities is often poor.

This list of Priority Medicines for Mothers and Children was developed by the World Health Organization, UNFPA and UNICEF to help countries and partners select and make available those medicines that will have the biggest impact on reducing maternal, newborn and child morbidity and mortality.



Rajmata Jijau Mother-Child Health and Nutrition Mission at Aurangabad, Maharashtra Rajmata Jijau Mother-Child Health and Nutrition Mission at Aurangabad, Maharashtra

Child Development Center - NRC - Nutrition Rehabilitation Center, child tracking web based system

The State Government has decided to establish the Rajmata Jijau Mother-Child Health and Nutrition Mission at Aurangabad to tackle the grave issues of malnutrition and mortality among the children. The mission would, over a period of five years, aim at significantly reducing the incidence of severe malnutrition amongst children in 0 to 6 age group. The mission objectives stress on health and nutrition of pregnant and lactating mothers as well as special attention to children during the first year of the birth. The mission is headed by a senior officer of the rank of secretary to the State Government. The mission would undertake major publicity campaign in all towns and villages of Maharashtra to stress the importance of health and nutrition, with the ultimate aim of progressively taking over the responsibility for mother and child care.



Acceptable medical reasons for use of breast-milk substitutes

Acceptable medical reasons for use of breast-milk substitutes

Authors: WHO
Number of pages: 6
Publication date: 2009

Overview

Almost all mothers can breastfeed successfully -- initiating breastfeeding within the first hour of life, breastfeeding exclusively for the first six months and continuing breastfeeding (along with giving appropriate complementary foods) up to two years of age or beyond. Positive effects of breastfeeding on the health of infants and mothers are observed in all settings.

Nevertheless, a small number of health conditions of the infant or the mother may justify recommending that she does not breastfeed temporarily or permanently. Whenever stopping breastfeeding is considered, the benefits of breastfeeding should be weighed against the risks posed by the presence of the specific conditions listed.

This list of acceptable medical reasons for temporary or long-term use of breast-milk substitutes is made available as an independent tool for health professionals working with mothers and newborn infants, as part of the Baby-friendly Hospitals Initiative.

English [pdf 209kb] | Portuguese [pdf 73kb]  | Spanish [pdf 115kb]



National Institute of Health and Family Welfare (NIHFW) is an Apex Technical Institute, funded by Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, for promotion of health and family welfare programmes in the country through education, training, research, evaluation, consultancy and specialised services.

National Child Health Resource Centre (NCHRC) was established in 2008 at National Institute of Health & Family Welfare (NIHFW) with the approval from the Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India and with financial support from Norway India Partnership Initiative & United Nations Office for Project Services (NIPI - UNOPS).

National Child Health Resource Centre - Publications

National Child Health Resource Centre - Guidelines and Manuals

Useful links on Child Health

Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoHFW)
National Rural Health Mission (NRHM)
Reproductive and Child Health (RCH)
National Health Systems Resource Centre (NHSRC)
Solution Exchange - MCH Community
Central Bureau of Health Intelligence (CBHI)
National Family Health Survey (NFHS)
District Level Household and Facility Survey (DLHS)
Indian Academy of Pediatrics (IAP)
National Neonatology Forum (NNF)
WHO Collaborating Centre for Newborn Care



 

Development of an Atlas of Cancer in India
A project of the National Cancer Registry Programme (Indian Council of Medical Research)

The main objectives of the project are:
(i) To obtain an overview of patterns of cancer in different parts of the country;
(ii) To calculate estimates of cancer incidence wherever feasible.

The overall aim of the study is to get to know the similarities and differences in patterns of cancer across the country in a relatively cost-effective way using recent advances in computer and information technology transmission. Knowing patterns of cancer across the country would provide important leads in undertaking aetiological research, in targeting cancer control measures and in examining clinical outcomes.



Infant and Young Child Nutrition (IYCN) Project

 

The Infant and Young Child Nutrition (IYCN) Project maintains a collection of useful resources on maternal nutrition, infant and young child feeding, prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT), and more. Our collection offers a variety of high-quality training materials, publications, web links, and other helpful resources.



Health Education Library for People


Get Answers to all your Health Questions Online
Would you like a quick consult about a medical problem, symptom or just want more information on a medical topic. This a FREE service.

Patient education is an integral part of health care delivery across medical centers in developed countries thus encouraging active patient participation and ensuring far better compliance and patient satisfaction.

What started as a resource center eleven years back, with a modest collection of material on patient education has grown into India's only largest patient education center housing more than 11,000 authentic books on possibly every aspect of health and diseases, along with pamphlets, health care magazines, and an exhaustive audiovisual section too.

HELP was also documented to be the world's largest Free library on consumer health information in the Limca book of records. State of the art infertility specialists to the world, Founders and visionaries for HELP, our Medical Directors have paved the path for the new "patient-centric health care "revolution in India.


 

WHO/UNICEF Joint Statement on home-based care of newbornsWHO/UNICEF Joint Statement on home-based care of newborns

Authors: WHO/UNICEF
Number of pages: 8
Publication date: 2009
Languages: English [pdf 259kb] French [pdf 269kb]  Spanish [pdf 292kb]
WHO reference number: WHO/FCH/CAH/09.02

Every year, about 3.7 million babies die in the first four weeks of life (2004 estimates). Most of these newborns are born in developing countries and most die at home. Up to two-thirds of these deaths can be prevented if mothers and newborns receive known, effective interventions. A strategy that promotes universal access to antenatal care, skilled birth attendance and early postnatal care will contribute to sustained reduction in maternal and neonatal mortality.

While both mothers and newborns need care during the period after birth, this Statement focuses on the care of the newborn child, and the evidence for the same. Studies have shown that home-based newborn care interventions can prevent 30–60% of newborn deaths in high mortality settings under controlled conditions. Therefore, WHO and UNICEF now recommend home visits in the baby’s first week of life to improve newborn survival.

This Joint Statement includes information on how to care for the newborn child at home, specific recommendations for countries, and next steps.

The Statement recommends that home visits occur on days one and three of a newborn's life, and if possible, a third visit should take place before the end of the first week of life (day seven). During home visits, skilled health workers should perform the following measures:

  • promote and support early (within the first hour after birth) and exclusive breastfeeding;
  • help to keep the newborn warm (promoting skin-to-skin contact between mother and infant);
  • promote hygienic umbilical cord and skin care;
  • assess the baby for signs of serious health problems, and advise families to seek prompt medical care if necessary (danger signs include feeding problems, or if the newborn has reduced activity, difficult breathing, a fever, fits or convulsions, or feels cold);
  • encourage birth registration and timely vaccination according to national schedules; and
  • identify and support newborns that need additional care (e.g. those that are low-birth-weight, sick or have an HIV-infected mother).


 

Healthcare Information For All by 2015Healthcare Information For All by 2015 (HIFA2015) is a global campaign and 'think-tank' that brings together more than 2400 health professionals, librarians and publishers from 148 countries worldwide, committed to a common goal: By 2015, every person worldwide will have access to an informed health care provider.

HIFA2015 was launched at the 10th Congress of the Association for Health Information and Libraries in Africa, in Mombasa, Kenya, in 2006. The campaign highlights the link between the lack of relevant, reliable information for healthcare providers in developing countries, and the daily toll of tens of thousands of deaths. Members share expertise and experience in two dynamic email forums: HIFA2015 and CHILD2015. During 2009, the campaign includes a special focus on the information and learning needs of nurses and midwives in low-resource settings.

Click here to join HIFA2015 and CHILD2015, send your name, email, organisation and brief description of interests.


 

Knowledge for HealthKnowledge for Health Project - Our mission here at K4Health is to increase the use and dissemination of evidence-based, accurate and up-to-date information to improve health service delivery and health outcomes worldwide. Using the K4Health platform, we are able to facilitate how this information is captured, synthesized, shared, adapted, and used. Through virtual collaboration, we are able to monitor and evaluate K4Health’s products and services to ensure that they meet the needs of key audiences, including policy makers, program managers, and health service providers working in international public health settings.


 

 

The Child Development Index

South Asia has a high level of deprivation, scoring 26.4; this is 3 times worse than East Asia. It is also making slow progress, improving child well-being by just 32% over 1990-2006 (compared to East Asia’s 45% improvement). This is because India (where almost three-quarters of the region’s children live) made the least progress of any country in South Asia; just a 27% improvement. In this region, child nutrition is a substantial obstacle; almost 1 in 2 children is underweight. Malnutrition levels are not being reduced rapidly enough; the region’s enrolment indicator improved by 59% while its nutrition indicator improved by only 14%. Higher levels of economic growth in the region are not widely translating into reduced child deprivation. 30 pages - The Child Development Index in pdf formatpdf 228 kb ...more

 


AuthorMapper

AuthorMapper is a free online tool for visualizing scientific research that enables discovery based on author locations and geographic maps. With AuthorMapper you can:
  •  Explore patterns in scientific research
  •  Identify new and historic literature trends
  •  Discover wider relationships
  •  Locate other experts in your field
AuthorMapper currently searches nearly 2,000 journals in the Springer Journals collection across all subject areas. Users can search by keywords, browse subject collections, or search for open access articles using Advanced Search. Search results display with complementary graphs, timelines, and keyword tag clouds that help visually summarize the data and also be used to further refine a search.

 


Exemplar

Exemplar is a free linguistic tool designed to aid the publishing process for authors, editors and the scientific community at large. Exemplar allows researchers to quickly see how a particular word or phrase is used in English-language, peer reviewed, published literature.
 
Users include authors to whom English is a second language and want to check word usage accuracy, authors who want suggestions on how to express themselves or want to confirm how a particular word or phrase is used in published literature; educators who are looking for authentic phrases and sentences for teaching and testing; and editors and reviewers who want to confirm whether or not a particular turn of phrase is justified by usage.

 


Mother-Child Protection Card

The Mother and Child Protection Card (MCP Card) has been introduced through a collaborative effort of the Ministry of Women and Child Development and the Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India

The MCP card is a tool for informing and educating the mother and family on different aspects of maternal and child care and linking maternal and childcare into a continuum of care through the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) scheme of Ministry of Women and Child Development and the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) of the Ministry of Health & Family Welfare (MoHFW).

The card also captures some of key services delivered to the mother & baby during Antenatal, Intranatal & Post natal care for ensuring that the minimum package of services are delivered to the beneficiary.

MCP card has already been disseminated in the year 2010-11 for implementation by the States.

The MCP card helps in timely identification, referral and management of complications during pregnancy, child birth and post natal period. The card also serves as a tool for providing complete immunization to infants and children, early and exclusive breast feeding, complementary feeding and monitoring their growth.


UNICEFMother-Child Protection Card and Guide


Benefiting

  • Families / Program participants
  • Anganwadi workers of ICDS 
    - Integrated Child Development Schemes
  • Nurse midwife
  • Supervisors of health and ICDS 

This guide book is to be used as a reference book by these functionaries of health and ICDS to focus on under three. The components are

  • Safe Motherhood
  • Care of the New born
  • Child Growth and Development
  • Nutrition
  • Immunisation and
  • The Importance of the Mother Child Protection Card
English

Mother Child Protection Card
click to enlarge
English

Mother Child Protection Card Side A
Side A click to enlarge



Mother Child Protection Card Side B
Side B click to enlarge

 

Download Card
Full Size
English


Side A  pdf formatpdf 3.2 mb
Side B
 pdf formatpdf 1.8 mb

Marathi

Mother Child Protection Card
click to enlarge
Marathi

Mother Child Protection Card
Side A click to enlarge



Mother Child Protection Card
Side B click to enlarge

 

Download Card
Full Size
Marathi


Side A & B
pdf formatpdf 7.4 mb

Assamese
Download Assamese version in pdf format
2.7 mb

Inside Pages
Download Assamese version of Inside Pages in pdf format
9.5 mb

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Bengali
Download Bengali version in pdf format
8.5 mb

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Kannada
Download Kannada version in pdf format
4.1 mb

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Odisha
Download Odisha version in pdf format
13.8 mb

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Telugu
Download Telugu version in pdf format
3 mb

A Guide For Use of the Mother-Child Protection Card

for the community and the family, Anganwadi Worker, Auxiliary Nurse Midwife & Sector Supervisors

Guide for Mother Child Protection Card
click to enlarge

Download Full Guide
English

pdf formatpdf  2 mb

Download Guide
Marathi


Front Cover pdf formatpdf  176 kb
pages 1-14 pdf formatpdf  1 mb
pages 15-30 pdf formatpdf  2 mb
pages 31-43 pdf formatpdf  1.3 mb
pages 44-56 pdf formatpdf  1.7 mb
Back Cover pdf formatpdf  176 kb




Dr. R. K. Anand's Guide to Child Care: For pregnant mothers and parents of infants, young children, and teenagers

Dr. R. K. Anand's Guide to Child Care is for pregnant mothers and parents of infants, young children, and teenagers. A definitive guide to the parent on pregnancy and childrearing from infancy to the teenage years. Authored by one of India's foremost paediatricians and an internationally renowned authority on breastfeeding, the book combines a knowledge of traditional childrearing practices with the latest medical developments in child care.

Dr. Anand's Guide to Child Care answers questions such as:
  • Is there a right age to have a baby?

  • What can I do when my baby cries?

  • Can a working mother successfully breastfeed?

  • How helpful is a joint family in bringing up children?

  • How should we handle our fussy eater?

  • Is my child ready for toilet-training?

  • Are vaccines safe?

  • When is the right age for sex education?

  • How can I raise a happy child?

  • Are drugs overprescribed for childhood illnesses?

  • How should we handle our teenager?

  • What should I do in a medical emergency?


 

Mother-Child Nutrition Mission, Maharashtra - V Ramani
Rajmata Jijau Mother-Child Health & Nutrition Mission, Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India
Presentation flash 778 kb  |  powerpoint 2.2 mb

 

Management of Severe Acute Malnutrition and Out Patient Therapeutic Program
Training Material

Ethiopia Links: Federal Ministry of Health  |  UNICEF  |  Play Therapy Africa


 

The WHO Child Growth Standards

India - National Workshop on Adoption of New WHO Child Growth Standards

The WHO web site presents complete information on the WHO Child Growth Standards.

These standards were developed using data collected in the WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study. The site presents documentation on how the physical growth curves and motor milestone windows of achievement were developed as well as application tools to support implementation of the standards.

 

New international Child Growth Standards for infants and young children provide evidence and guidance for the first time about how every child in the world should grow.

Documentation
The following documents describe the sample and methods used to construct the standards and present the final charts.

WHO Child Growth Standards: Methods and development
Acta Paediatrica Supplement
Chart catalogue | en Español


Indicators
The following links provide access to the first and second set of the WHO child growth standards (0-60 months):

:: Length/height-for-age
:: Weight-for-age
:: Weight-for-length
:: Weight-for-height
:: Body mass index-for-age (BMI-for-age)
:: Head circumference-for-age
:: Arm circumference-for-age
:: Subscapular skinfold-for-age
:: Triceps skinfold-for-age
:: Motor development milestones


Backgrounders
 

What are the WHO Child Growth Standards?
English [pdf 65kb] | French [pdf 69kb] | Spanish [pdf 63kb]
 

What impact will the WHO Child Growth Standards have?
English [pdf 65kb] | French [pdf 67kb] | Spanish [pdf 66kb]
 

WHO Child Growth Standards and Infant and Young Child Feeding
English [pdf 57kb] | French [pdf 55kb] | Spanish [pdf 55kb]

WHO Child Growth Standards and the double burden of malnutrition
English [pdf 60kb] | French [pdf 59kb] | Spanish [pdf 59kb]

 


 

 

WHO Child Growth Standards - Methods and development

WHO Child Growth Standards - Methods and development
Length/height-for-age, weight-for-age, weight-for-length, weight-for-height and body mass index-for-age
WHO Child Growth Standards - Methods and developmentpdf 26.6 mb - 336 pages

In 1993 the World Health Organization (WHO) undertook a comprehensive review of the uses and interpretation of anthropometric references. The review concluded that the NCHS/WHO growth reference, which had been recommended for international use since the late 1970s, did not adequately represent early childhood growth and that new growth curves were necessary. The World Health Assembly endorsed this recommendation in 1994. In response WHO undertook the Multicentre Growth Reference Study (MGRS) between 1997 and 2003 to generate new curves for assessing the growth and development of children the world over.

The MGRS combined a longitudinal follow-up from birth to 24 months and a cross-sectional survey of children aged 18 to 71 months. Primary growth data and related information were gathered from 8440 healthy breastfed infants and young children from widely diverse ethnic backgrounds and cultural settings (Brazil, Ghana, India, Norway, Oman and USA). The MGRS is unique in that it was purposely designed to produce a standard by selecting healthy children living under conditions likely to favour the achievement of their full genetic growth potential. Furthermore, the mothers of the children selected for the construction of the standards engaged in fundamental health-promoting practices, namely breastfeeding and not smoking.



The Training Course on Child Growth Assessment is a tool for the application of the WHO Child Growth Standards. It is intended primarily for health care providers who measure and assess the growth of children or who supervise these activities. The course is designed for use over 3 1/2 days. It teaches how to measure weight, length and height, how to interpret growth indicators, investigate causes of growth problems and counsel caregivers.

The course materials can be downloaded from the following links:
Course modules and growth records
Introduction - pdf, 418kb
Measuring a child's growth - pdf, 773kb
Interpreting growth indicators - pdf, 896kb
Counselling on growth and feeding - pdf, 862kb
Photo booklet - pdf, 599kb

Answer sheets - pdf, 654kb
Facilitator guide - pdf, 1.08Mb
Course director guide - pdf, 2.94Mb
Boy's growth record - pdf, 463kb
Girl's growth record - pdf, 474kb
Job aids
Measuring and weighing a child - pdf, 1.00Mb
BMI card - pdf, 55kb
Investigating causes of undernutrition and of overweight - pdf, 1.53Mb
The WHO child age calculator (a rotating disk mounted on a calendar in PVC material) for calculating child age is part of the course materials that will be made available in WHO Regional Offices when the trainers of trainers workshops are conducted in the respective Regions.



 

Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding

Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding
WHO - UNICEF
Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feedingpdf 440 kb - 37 pages

WHO and UNICEF jointly developed the Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding to revitalize world attention to the impact that feeding practices have on the nutritional status, growth and development, health, and thus the very survival of infants and young children.

The Global Strategy is based on the evidence of nutrition’s significance in the early months and years of life, and of the crucial role that appropriate feeding practices play in achieving optimal health outcomes. Lack of breastfeeding – and especially lack of exclusive breastfeeding during the first half-year of life – are important risk factors for infant and childhood morbidity and mortality that are only compounded by inappropriate complementary feeding. The life-long impact includes poor school performance, reduced productivity, and impaired intellectual and social development.

 


 

Community-based management of severe acute malnutrition

A Joint Statement by the World Health Organization, the World Food Programme, the United Nations System Standing Committee on Nutrition and the United Nations Children’s Fund

Severe acute malnutrition remains a major killer of children under five years of age. Until recently, treatment has been restricted to facility-based approaches, greatly limiting its coverage and impact. New evidence suggests, however, that large numbers of children with severe acute malnutrition can be treated in their communities without being admitted to a health facility or a therapeutic feeding centre.

The community-based approach involves timely detection of severe acute malnutrition in the community and provision of treatment for those without medical complications with ready-to-use therapeutic foods or other nutrient-dense foods at home. If properly combined with a facility-based approach for those malnourished children with medical complications and implemented on a large scale, community-based management of severe acute malnutrition could prevent the deaths of hundreds of thousands of children.

Joint statement
English 392kb | French 755kb

Press release
English | French | Spanish | Russian | Arabic | Chinese

 


 

 

 

Management of Severe Malnutrition: A Manual for Physicians and Other Senior Health Workers

Management of Severe Malnutrition: A Manual for Physicians and Other Senior Health Workers
Management of Severe Malnutrition: A Manual for Physicians and Other Senior Health Workerspdf 1.2 mb - 68 pages

Malnutrition remains one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality among children throughout the world. Approximately 9% of children below 5 years of age suffer from wasting (weight-for-height below 22 standard deviations (,22 SD) of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)/WHO reference values) and are at risk of death or severe impairment of growth and psychological development.

This manual is based on The treatment and management of severe protein–energy malnutrition, which was published by WHO in 1981. Since then, many advances have been made in the treatment of severe malnutrition. An improved oral rehydration salts (ORS) solution has been developed for the treatment of dehydration. Advances in knowledge of the physiological roles of micronutrients have led to improved dietary management during the initial phase of treatment. It has been shown that physical and psychological stimulation, as well as care and affection, are necessary during the rehabilitation phase in order to prevent retardation of growth and psychological development.

This manual provides guidelines for the treatment of severely malnourished children (below 5 years of age) in hospitals and health centres. The treatment of severely malnourished adolescents and adults is also briefly considered. The manual is intended for health personnel working at central and district level, including physicians, nurses, midwives and auxiliaries.

 


 

Repositioning Nutrition as Central to Development

Repositioning Nutrition as Central to Development
A Strategy for Large-Scale Action - 2006
Repositioning Nutrition as Central to Developmentpdf 1.6 mb - 272 pages - original at World Bank site

Persistent malnutrition contributes not only to widespread failure to meet the first Millennium Development Goal—to halve poverty and hunger—but also to meet other goals related to maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, education, and gender equity. Underweight prevalence among children is the key indicator for measuring progress on nonincome poverty, and malnutrition remains the world’s most serious health problem—as well as the single largest contributor to child mortality. Nearly one-third of children in the developing world are underweight or stunted, and more than 30 percent of the developing world’s population suffers from micronutrient deficiencies. Moreover, new malnutrition problems are emerging: the epidemic of obesity and diet-related noncommunicable diseases is spreading to the developing world, and malnutrition is linked to the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

Repositioning Nutrition as Central to Development: A Strategy for Large-Scale Action makes the case that development partners and developing countries must increase investment in nutrition programs. This case is based on evidence that the scale of the problem is very large and that nutrition interventions are essential for speeding poverty reduction, have high benefit-cost ratios, and can improve nutrition much faster than reliance on economic growth alone. Moreover, improved nutrition can drive economic growth. The report proposes to the international development community and national governments a global strategy for accelerated action in nutrition.

 


 

Counting on Communication: The Uganda Nutrition and Early Childhood Development Project

Counting on Communication: The Uganda Nutrition and Early Childhood Development Project - 2005 - World Bank Working Paper No. 59
Counting on Communication: The Uganda Nutrition and Early Childhood Development Projectpdf 3.2 mb - 56 pages - original at World Bank site

Counting on Communication is part of the World Bank Working Paper series. These papers are published to communicate the results of the Bank’s ongoing research and to stimulate public discussion. This publication is the first in a series of Working Papers sponsored by the Development Communication Division (DevComm) of the World Bank’s External Affairs Vice-Presidency. This series is designed to share innovations and lessons learned in the application of strategic communication in development projects. Together with other donors, NGOs, and private sector partners, DevComm seeks to mainstream the discipline of development communication in development practice.

The Uganda Nutrition and Early Childhood Development Project was one of DevComm’s first projects to demonstrate the valueadded of strategic communication. The strategic communication component developed for this project included the use of formative research about values and attitudes with respect to child rearing, in order to develop and test effective messages. The communication strategy was developed in a highly participatory manner and included nurturing a team of champions for the project among policymakers, district officials, community leaders, and grassroots organizations to advocate for the project. It also included two-way communication activities developed to address the practices and behaviors that would need to be changed in order for the project to be successful, rather than merely disseminating messages based on assumptions of project benefits.

World Bank Working Papers are available individually or by subscription, both in print and online.

 


 

City Initiative for Newborn Health - Mumbai - Overview and Protocol

City Initiative for Newborn Health - Mumbai - Overview and Protocol
A Collaboration Between SNEHA, MCGM, IPU AND ICICI Bank
City Initiative for Newborn Health - Mumbai - Overview and Protocolpdf 732 kb - 34 pages

Goal

To improve the health and survival of mothers and newborn infants in underprivileged communities in Mumbai.

Purpose

To work with community members in urban slums to achieve improvements in maternal and newborn care practices and care seeking.

To work with municipal health service providers to strengthen decentralised primary care:

  • To achieve provision of high quality antenatal and postnatal care at health posts.
  • To encourage continuous quality improvement in maternal and neonatal services at maternity homes and hospitals and along the referral chain.

To test replicable and scaleable models of interventions to improve maternal and newborn health.

Methods
The initiative’s primary strategies are to encourage change through participation, self-sustaining group activities, ownership, and appreciative inquiry. The first phase of the initiative will run for 4 years. For the purposes of management and evaluation the package will be organised into three components. Within each component, strategies will be devised by groups convened to plan interventions to improve maternal and neonatal health. Intervention will take place at a number of levels, from community to tertiary.

 


 

Ranchi Low Birth Weight Project - Study Protocol

Ranchi Low Birth Weight Project - Study Protocol
Reducing Incidence of Low Birth Weight using a Community based Life Cycle Strategy

Krishi Gram Vikas Kendra, Child In Need Institute, Social Initiatives Group, ICICI Bank
Ranchi Low Birth Weight Project - Study Protocolpdf 805 kb - 16 pages

The Ranchi Low Birth Weight Project is a quasi-experimental action research study to evaluate the effectiveness of life-cycle based community level behavioural interventions in reducing the incidence of low birth weight and improving maternal and child health in Ranchi district of Jharkhand state in India.

Aims

Low birth weight (LBW) and childhood malnutrition continue to be major public health problems in India. It is well recognised that maternal and child health services as well as a range of behavioural factors need to work synergistically to break the intergenerational cycle of malnutrition and improve these key indicators which determine long term prosperity and productivity of a nation. Both on the partners' and other experiences in India and elsewhere, interventions in the Ranchi LBW project aim to improve maternal and infant health outcomes by addressing a range of medico-social and behavioural determinants of low birth weight. The study envisages implementing and evaluating the additive effects of community level behavioural interventions in bringing about positive improvements in maternal and infant health outcomes in an area where mandated public health and related services are ensured.

 


2006 Global Hunger Index

Wiesmann, Doris. 2006. 2006 Global Hunger Index: A Basis for Cross-Country Comparisons. Washington, DC: International Food Policy Research Institute. - October 13, 2006


The International Food Policy Research Institute has released its new Global Hunger Index, an innovative and enhanced approach for measuring hunger in developing and transitional countries. The index reveals hunger hotspots, shows which countries and regions have improved over time, and demonstrates the links between hunger and violent conflict.


Understanding the Links between Agriculture and Health (a collection of 16 briefs)

 


Tuberculosis (TB)

Global TB Control Report 2011
View contents and download data

 

The Global Plan to Stop TB 2011-2015The Global Plan to Stop TB 2011-2015
The Plan

 

Treatment of tuberculosis: guidelines - 4th editionTreatment of TB: guidelines
Read the guidelines

 

Multidrug and extensively drug-resistant TB (M/XDR-TB):  2010 global report on surveillance and responseMultidrug and extensively drug- resistant TB
Read the report

 

Stop TB Strategy book coverThe Stop TB Strategy
The Stop TB Strategy

 


Stop TB in regions

Useful links

 

World Food Programme Presentations

ending child hunger and undernutrition initiative ending child hunger and undernutrition initiative - Copenhagen, 19 June 2006
overview of issues and moving forward
World Health Organization
Presentation flash 785 kb  |  powerpoint 2.6 mb
Ending Child Hunger in India Ending Child Hunger in India
Partnering with Local Institutions for National Advocacy
World Food Programme
World Health Organization
Presentation flash 70 kb  |  powerpoint 179 kb
Providing an 'essential package' for child survival: WFP and UNICEF in Ethiopia Providing an 'essential package' for child survival: WFP and UNICEF in Ethiopia
Government of Ethiopia - World Food Programme - UNICEF
World Health Organization
Presentation flash 100 kb  |  powerpoint 666 kb
End Child Hunger and Undernutrition Initiative in Latin America and the Caribbean End Child Hunger and Undernutrition Initiative in Latin America and the Caribbean
United in the Battle to End Child Hunger - WFP Global Meeting Copenhagen - June 2006
World Food Programme - UNICEF
World Health Organization
Presentation flash 187 kb  |  powerpoint 424 kb

 


India's Undernourished Children: A Call for Reform and Action India's Undernourished Children
A Call for Reform and Action


India's Undernourished Children: A Call for Reform and Actionpdf 3.2 mb - 116 pages - original at World Bank site

Michele Gragnolati; Caryn Bredenkamp; Meera Shekar; Monica Das Gupta; Yi-Kyoung Lee
Publisher: The World Bank
Keywords: Nutrition; Anganwadi; Health; India; Food; ICDS; Child; South Asia; Malnutrition


The prevalence of child undernutrition in India is among the highest in the world, nearly double that of Sub-Saharan Africa, with dire consequences for morbidity, mortality, productivity and economic growth. Drawing on qualitative studies and quantitative evidence from large household surveys, this book explores the dimensions of child undernutrition in India and examines the effectiveness of the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) program, India's main early child development intervention, in addressing it. Although levels of undernutrition in India declined modestly during the 1990s, the reductions lagged behind those achieved by other countries with similar economic growth. Nutritional inequalities across different states and socioeconomic and demographic groups remain large. Although the ICDS program appears to be well-designed and well-placed to address the multi-dimensional causes of malnutrition in India, several problems exist that prevent it from reaching its potential. The book concludes with a discussion of a number of concrete actions that can be taken to bridge the gap between the policy intentions of ICDS and its actual implementation.


 


 

Electronic Teaching-aids At Low Cost

e-TALC is a project of Teaching-aids At Low Cost (TALC), which provides an up-to-date, authoritative source of electronic health information for health workers in developing countries who have access to computers but limited access to the internet.   more info


 

Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How Many Thousands of Men and Women Have Recovered from Alcoholism

Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How Many Thousands of Men and Women Have Recovered from Alcoholism

Online Versions: aa.org  | anonpress.org

It's more than a book. It's a way of life. Alcoholics Anonymous-the Big Book-has served as a lifeline to millions worldwide. First published in 1939, Alcoholics Anonymous sets forth cornerstone concepts of recovery from alcoholism and tells the stories of men and women who have overcome the disease. With publication of the second edition in 1955, the third edition in 1976, and now the fourth edition in 2001, the essential recovery text has remained unchanged while personal stories have been added to reflect the growing and diverse fellowship. The long-awaited fourth edition features 24 new personal stories of recovery. Key features and benefits �the most widely used resource for millions of individuals in recovery �contains full, original text describing AA program �updated with 24 new personal stories

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is an informal meeting society for recovering alcoholics whose primary purpose is to stay sober and help other alcoholics achieve sobriety.AA suggests that alcoholics follow its program and abstain from alcohol in order to recover from alcoholism, and share their experience, strength, and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem.AA was the first twelve-step program and has been the model for similar recovery groups like Narcotics Anonymous. Al-Anon/Alateen are programs designed to provide support for relatives and friends of alcoholics. The organization was named after its primary guidebook Alcoholics Anonymous, also known as The Big Book. Although AA is not for everyone, there is growing evidence supporting the effectiveness of AA as a treatment for alcoholism.

575 pages - Alcoholics Anonymous World Services; 4 Revised edition (February 10, 2002) - English
ISBN-10: 1893007162, ISBN-13: 978-1893007161

 


 

Knowledge and Use of Oral Rehydration Therapy for Childhood Diarrhoea in India: Effects of Exposure to Mass Media
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Knowledge and Use of Oral Rehydration Therapy for Childhood Diarrhoea in India: Effects of Exposure to Mass Media

Results from these two studies indicate that, despite a vigorous Oral Rehydration Therapy Programme in India for more than a decade, knowledge and use of ORT to treat childhood diarrhoea remain quite limited. Very small percentages of children who fall sick with diarrhoea are treated with oral rehydration salt (ORS) packets, recommended home solution (RHS), or increased fluids, despite the fact that 61 percent of these children receive treatment from a health facility or provider. In the NFHS, among children born 1-47 months before the survey who had diarrhoea in the last two weeks, 18 percent were given ORS and 19 percent were given RHS. Considered together, only 31 percent were given ORS or RHS.

Among those who receive treatment from a health facility or provider, a very large proportion (94 percent) are treated with antibiotics or other antidiarrhoeal drugs, contrary to WHO recommendations that drugs not be used to treat diarrhoea in young children. The use of drugs is common among both public- and private-sector providers but is more common in the private sector.

The analysis indicates that the electronic mass media are effective in increasing awareness and use of ORT. Women regularly exposed to the media are much more likely than unexposed women to know about ORS packets and to use ORS or RHS. This result is valid even after controlling for the effects of a number of potentially confounding variables by holding them constant. Results also indicate some discrimination against girls in the use of ORS.

These findings suggest that both mothers and health-care providers are not well informed about the proper treatment of childhood diarrhoea. There is clearly a need to strengthen education programmes for mothers and to provide supplemental training to health-care providers, emphasizing the importance of increased fluid intake and discouraging the use of unnecessary and often harmful drugs. The Oral Rehydration Therapy Programme also needs to address the problem of gender discrimination in the treatment of diarrhoea. In all these efforts, the mass media can help.

Audience:

K.V. Rao, Vinod K. Mishra, and Robert D. Hetherford

National Family Health Survey Subject Reports
Number 10 - November 1998

55 pages - Knowledge and Use of Oral Rehydration Therapy for Childhood Diarrhoea in India: Effects of Exposure to Mass Media in pdf format pdf 160 kb


 


Gender Differences in Treatment-seeking Behaviour during Common Childhood Illnesses in India: Does Maternal Education Matter?
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Gender Differences in Treatment-seeking Behaviour during Common Childhood Illnesses in India: Does Maternal Education Matter?

Gender inequalities, in one form or the other, with considerable contextual differences, are ubiquitous and all-pervasive in South Asia. In health, these are manifested in differences in mortality (observed by overall sex-ratio) in almost every country in this region. India is no exception in this regard. Discrimination and gender gaps have been observed even in early years of life. Beside other factors, discriminatory treatment-seeking practices among children during the post-neonatal and later childhood period probably contribute to this.

There are numerous studies which have established the positive effect of maternal education on child health and survival. But there are contradictory evidences that whether maternal education reduces gender bias in treatment-seeking behaviour or not and the debate over it remains inconclusive.

By using National Family and Health Survey (NFHS-2), 1998-99, the present study observed that the gender bias in treatment seeking behaviour does exist among illiterate and middle school educated women when child is affected by acute respiratory infections and reduces considerably among higher educated mother.

In case of diarrhoea no evidence of gender differences in treatment seeking behaviour has been found statistically irrespective of the level of maternal education, even after controlling all other spatial, demographic and socioeconomic factors.

Audience:

Saswata Ghosh
Research Scholar, Centre for the Study of Regional Development, School of Social Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi India.

18th European Conference on Modern South Asian Studies
University of Lund, Sweden
6-9 July, 2004

National Family Health Survey Subject Reports
Number 10 - November 1998

17 pages - Gender Differences in Treatment-seeking Behaviour .... in pdf format pdf 193 kb


Maharashtra, India


Human Development Reports

Maharashtra State - Waterborne Diseases Epidemic Information
For the  last 10 years - as at 20 March 2004

Maharashtra State - ORS Supply Information
For the  last 10 years - as at 20 March 2004

 


Diarrhea and Hydration Therapy
Diarrhea and Hydration Therapy
Training Presentation - Amit Chandra, MD - March 2006 - 25 slides
Niramaya Health Foundation
Presentation flash 433 kb.

Prevention and Treatment of Diarrhea
Community Outreach Flipbook
Prepared by: Amit Chandra, MD - March 2006
Niramaya Health Foundation

 

Maharashtra State Health Status
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Maharashtra State - Health Status
in English
- html version

66 pages - Maharastra State Health Status in pdf formatpdf 8.2 mb




Maharashtra State Health Status in Marathi
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Maharashtra State - Health Status
in Marathi


Audience:

2002

67 pages - Maharashtra State - Health Status - Marathi - in pdf formatpdf 2 mb




Health and Healthcare in Maharashtra - A Status Report - 2005

Health and Healthcare in Maharashtra
A Status Report - 2005


Maharashtra has been in the forefront of healthcare development in the country. It was among the first states to decentralize primary healthcare administration through Zilla Parishads as early as1961. Further, under the Minimum Needs Program Maharashtra was again one of the first states to achieve the norms mandated for primary health centres, subcentres and Rural Hospitals. The state also has the largest private health sector in India whose reach is quite extensive.

While Maharashtra is today also the most affluent state in the country with the highest per capita income, and contributes over 15% of the country’s national income and 40% of the tax revenues, it continues to have high levels of poverty and inequalities which get reflected in health outcomes which are not the best in the country. Thus Maharashtra has to still struggle with malnutrition deaths, child mortality and maternal mortality levels not commensurate with its economic position in the country, declining child sex-ratios, low and declining levels of public health spending and investments, high levels of vacant positions of doctors at PHCs and CHCs, and low levels of access to various health services like antenatal care, complete child immunization, institutional deliveries etc.


81 pages - Health and Healthcare in Maharashtra - A Status Report - 2005 - in pdf formatpdf 1.5 mb


Guides

Diarrhoea - Guide 1
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Diarrhoea - Guide 1

4 pages - Diarrhoea Brochure 1 in pdf formatpdf 563 kb


 


Diarrhoea - Guide 2
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Diarrhoea - Guide 2

14 pages  - Diarrhoea Brochure 2 in pdf formatpdf 1.2 mb


 


Understanding and Managing Acute Diarrhoea in Infants and Young Children
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Understanding and Managing Acute Diarrhoea
in Infants and Young Children


30 pages  - Understanding and Managing Acute Diarrhoea in Infants and Young Children in pdf formatpdf 1.2 mb


 


Better Care During Diarrhoea
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Better Care During Diarrhoea

32 pages  - Understanding and Managing Acute Diarrhoea in Infants and Young Children in pdf formatpdf 4.1 mb


 


Management of Acute Diarrhoea - An update for the General Medical Practitioner
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Management of Acute Diarrhoea
An update for the General Medical Practitioner


Audience:

Directorate of Health Services, Govt. of Maharashtra, Pune
Booklet supported by UNICEF, Bombay

16 pages - Management of Acute Diarrhoea in pdf formatpdf 456 kb


 


Diarrhoea - Green Guide 3
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Diarrhoea - Guide 3

Audience:

Govt. of India, Central Health Education Bureau, Ministry of health and Family Welfare

May 1984

8 pages - Diarrhoea Guide in pdf formatpdf 2.5 mb


 


Marathi Cookbook - Iron and Vitamin C Rich Recipes - Gharchya Ghari Anaemia Tala
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Marathi Cookbook
Iron and Vitamin C Rich Recipes
Gharchya Ghari Anaemia Tala


Audience:

June 2002

67 pages - Marathi Cookbook - Iron and Vitamin C Rich Recipes - Gharchya Ghari Anaemia Tala in pdf formatpdf 2.8 mb


 


Developing an Alternative Strategy for Achieving Health for All
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Developing an Alternative Strategy for Achieving Health for All
The ICSSR/ICMR Model - The FRCH Experience


Audience:

Noshir Antia, Seema Deodhar, Nerges Mistry
Foundation for Research in Community Health, Pune / Mumbai
2004

52 pages - Developing an Alternative Strategy for Achieving Health for All in pdf formatpdf 844 kb


 


Management of Critically Sick Child
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Management of Critically Sick Child

Audience:

Directorate of Health Services Maharashtra State
Department of Paediatrics, Cama & Albless Hospital, Mumbai
Maharashtra State Health Education Bureau, Aundh, Pune
1997-1998

41 pages - Management of Crticially Sick Child in pdf formatpdf 9.5 mb


 


Maharashtra - Guide
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Maharashtra - Guide

Audience:


26 pages - Maharashtra in pdf formatpdf 879 kb


 


Anganwadi - Guide
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Anganwadi - Guide

Audience:


49 pages - Maharashtra Anganwadi Guide in pdf formatpdf 2.1 mb


 


Child Mortality Determinants in three Backward Districts of Maharashtra - Nandurbar, Jalna and Yavatmal Child Mortality Determinants in three Backward Districts of Maharashtra
Nandurbar, Jalna and Yavatmal
2003-2004

By Shyam Ashtekar, Dhruv Mankad, Kranti Raimane
BharatVaidyak Sanstha, NASIK
Courtesy of Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India
January 2004

An array of factors-some antecedents and some determinants -- interplay to cause child deaths directly or indirectly. We can understand them as sectors--social sector, environment, health system etc. Each sector is amenable to different interventions and our main effort here is to see what can be done through the health system to improve child survival. This does not mean that other sectors are less important, in fact they can be more important and economical for interventions, but there are separate reports on these sectors. It is needless to stress that the sectors overlap and intermingle and the accompanying figure only serves to bring clarity in approach.

Our team of 3 researchers studied Child mortality and its determinants in three low HDI districts of Maharashtra--Nandurbar, Yavatmal, and Jalna. The study used secondary data, mainly MIS report and qualitative methods for direct inquiry. The study was undertaken in Sept 2003. Interviews with district health staff, PHC MOs, LHVs, ANM, TBAs, AWWs, PMPs, families, NGOs and RH doctors were conducted with help of semi-structured questionnaires.

111 pages - Child Mortality Determinants in three Backward Districts of Maharashtra in pdf formatpdf 1.3 mb


 


Swasthya Sathi - Book 1

Swasthya Sathi - Book 1

Audience:
Language:
Duration:
Abstract: 

 


 


Karu Aarogyachi Sath - Book 1

Karu Aarogyachi Sath - Book 1

Audience:
Language:
Duration:
Abstract: 


 


Karu Aarogyachi Sath - Book 2

Karu Aarogyachi Sath - Book 2

Audience:
Language:
Duration:
Abstract: 
 

Posters

Poster 1
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Diarrhoea Poster 1pdf 216 kb

Poster 2
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Diarrhoea Poster 2pdf 188 kb

Poster 3
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Diarrhoea Poster 3pdf 142 kb

Poster 4
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Diarrhoea Poster 4pdf 209 kb


Advertising Materials

Advertising 1
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Diarrhoea Advertising 1pdf 46 kb

Diarrhoea Advertising 2
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Diarrhoea Advertising 2pdf 48 kb

 

Diarrhoea Advertising 3
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Diarrhoea Advertising 3pdf 103 kb

Diarrhoea Advertising 4
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Diarrhoea Advertising 4pdf 108 kb


India

638387.org : 638387 Villages of India

If India has to become a developed nation, India's villages must be developed. To share the basic statistics of every village of India, this portal has 638387 pages and one for each tehsil and district.

The mandate of Developed Nation Network is to work on major campaigns and sensitise Indians and people around the world on the social and developmental canvas of India through information dissemination and creative campaign.


 

Child Protection: A Handbook for Parliamentarians

Child Protection: A Handbook for Parliamentarians

Audience: Parliamentarians

UNICEF India
2005

Hindi 182 pages - Child Protection: A Handbook for Parliamentarianspdf 2.4 mb


 

WHO - Diarrhoeal Diseases Control - Esamples of Health Education Materials
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Diarrhoeal Diseases Control
Examples of Health Education Materials


Audience:

WHO
1982

Multi-language examples from around the world
Posters  39 pages - Posters - WHO Diarrhoeal Diseases Control Examples of Health Education Materials in pdf formatpdf 12 mb
Flash cards  4 pages - Flash cards - Diarrhoeal Diseases Control Examples of Health Education Materials in pdf formatpdf 1.3mb
Leaflets  11 pages - Leaflets - WHO Diarrhoeal Diseases Control Examples of Health Education Materials in pdf formatpdf 4 mb
Slide sets  4 pages - Slide sets - WHO Diarrhoeal Diseases Control Examples of Health Education Materials in pdf formatpdf 696 kb
Newsletters and comics  2 pages - Newsletters and comics - WHO Diarrhoeal Diseases Control Examples of Health Education Materials in pdf formatpdf 899 kb

Complete document   60 pages - WHO - Diarrhoeal Diseases Control Examples of Health Education Materials in pdf formatpdf 18.9 mb


 


Diarrhoea - Diagnosis, Treatment & Control
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Diarrhoea - Diagnosis, Treatment & Control

Audience:

Directorate General of Health Services, Government of India, New Delhi
Central Health Education Bureau, Ministry of Health & Family Welfare
April 1985

16 pages - Diarrhoea - Diagnosis, Treatment & Control in pdf formatpdf 2.3 mb


 


Training of Doctors on Nutritional Care During Diarrhoea
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Training of Doctors on Nutritional Care During Diarrhoea

Audience:

National Diarrhoeal Diseases Control & O.R.T. Programmes
Government of India, Directorate General of Health Services, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, New Delhi, India
prepared by the
National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases (ICMR) Calcutta, India


15 pages - Training of Doctors on Nutritional Care During Diarrhoea in pdf formatpdf 780 kb


 


The Management of Diarrhoea and Use of Oral Rehydration Therapy
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The Management of Diarrhoea and Use of Oral Rehydration Therapy - Second Edition - A Joint WHO/UNICEF Statement

Audience:

prepared by WHO/UNICEF
1992

30 pages - The Management of Diarrhoea and Use of Oral Rehydration Therapy in pdf formatpdf 626 kb


 


National Guidelines on Infant and Young Child Feeding - Aug 2004
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National Guidelines on Infant and Young Child Feeding

Audience:

Ministry of Human Resource Development, Department of Women and Child Development, Food and Nutrition Board, Government of India
August 2004

37 pages - National Guidelines on Infant and Young Child Feeding - Aug 2004 in pdf formatpdf 936 kb


 


National Guidelines on Infant Feeding
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National Guidelines on Infant Feeding

Audience:

Food and Nutrition Board, Department of Women and Child Development, Ministry of Human Resources Development, Government of India.
1992

17 pages - National Guidelines on Infant Feeding in pdf formatpdf 2.5 mb


 


Policy on Control of Nutritional Anaemia
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Policy on Control of Nutritional Anaemia

Audience:

Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India
January 1991

11 pages - Policy on Control of Nutritional Anaemia in pdf formatpdf 1.7 mb


 


Prevention and Control of Nutritional Anaemia: A South Asia Priority
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Prevention and Control of Nutritional Anaemia: A South Asia Priority

Audience:

United Nations Children's Fund - Regional Office for South Asia
2002

16 pages - Prevention and Control of Nutritional Anaemia: A South Asia Priority in pdf formatpdf 2 mb


 


Preventing and Controlling Iron Deficiency Anaemia Through Primary Health Care
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Preventing and Controlling Iron Deficiency Anaemia Through Primary Health Care

Audience: A Guide for Health Administrators and Programme Managers

E. M. DeMaeyer
Formerly Medical Officer, Nutrition, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland
with the collaboration of
P. Dallman, J. M. Gurney, L. Hallberg, S. K. Sood & S. G. Srikantia
1989

61 pages - Preventing and Controlling Iron Deficiency Anaemia Through Primary Health Care in pdf formatpdf 1.7 mb


 


Measles Control: An Urban Challenge
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Measles Control: An Urban Challenge

Audience:

National Immunization Programme, Government of India
1998

32 pages - Measles Control: An Urban Challenge in pdf formatpdf 4.3 mb


 


Sahyogini - Animator to guide Self Help Groups

Sahyogini
Animator to guide Self Help Groups

Audience:
All NGOs, Institutes and Persons working in the Self Help Group Movement.

Abstract:
This book is based on the experiences and achievements of the Maharashtra Rural Credit Programme. Sahyogini (Animator) is the back bone of this programme working in the villages with the Self Help Group to Guide & Help them by providing technical support. This book is focused on the working procedure of the Self Help Group Dynamics, Formation, Structure, working procedure etc. This guide answers frequently asked questions.

41 pages - Sahyogini - Animator to guide Self Help Groups in pdf formatpdf 3 mb


 


Mahilanche Hakk Anni Adhikar - Women's Rights & Laws

Mahilanche Hakk Anni Adhikar
Women's Rights & Laws

Audience:
All NGOs, Institutes and Persons working in the women empowerment and Development.

Abstract:
This book is published by Women’s Development Cooperation (Mavim), a Government of Maharashtra undertaking. This book tries to focus on the Government Resolutions issued by the Government of Maharashtra and on the various aspects of laws related to women and the rights provided to her. This book highlights objectives of the Government resolution and about the Acts. Basic things all should know about legal and judicial system. Its Objective, Protection for women under the Acts, how the Act can be a useful for a women etc are presented in the books.

This book is the guideline for the field worker circulated along with the video film.

59 pages - Mahilanche Hakk Anni Adhikar - Women's Rights & Laws in pdf formatpdf 6.6 mb


 


Mahila Anni Balvikasanchya Yojana - Women and Child Development Schemes (Guidelines)

Mahila Anni Balvikasanchya Yojana
Women and Child Development Schemes (Guidelines)

Audience:
NGOs, Officers, Staff and elected members of different government and Non-government Organisation and the direct benefices of the schemes.

Abstract:
This guide focuses on the development schemes of state government related to Women and Child development. This book gives brief information about the schemes as well as the contact numbers of the responsible officers. This facilitates the beneficiary to approach the right person in right department.

Pages       1-50 - Pages 1-50 - Mahila Anni Balvikasanchya Yojana - Women and Child Development Schemes (Guidelines) in pdf formatpdf 4.5 mb
Pages    51-100 - Pages 51-100 - Mahila Anni Balvikasanchya Yojana - Women and Child Development Schemes (Guidelines) in pdf formatpdf 4.5 mb
Pages  101-150 - Pages 101-150 - Mahila Anni Balvikasanchya Yojana - Women and Child Development Schemes (Guidelines) in pdf formatpdf 2.0 mb
Pages  151-175 - Pages 151-175 - Mahila Anni Balvikasanchya Yojana - Women and Child Development Schemes (Guidelines) in pdf formatpdf 1.7 mb

 

Vitamin A: Frequently Asked Questions - English
Vitamin A: Frequently Asked Questions - Marathi -  Vitamin A FAQs in Marathi - pdf formatpdf 49 kb

Vitamin A Marathi brochure -  Vitamin A Marathi brochure in pdf formatpdf 470 kb

Vitamin A Marathi brochure - front
Front - download 219 kb
Vitamin A Marathi brochure - back
Back - download 274 kb

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The great Vitamin A fiasco - World Nutrition - May 2010
Michael Latham

This commentary challenges the wisdom and validity of the current practice of providing to children between 6 months and 5 years, regular supplements of massive medicinal doses of vitamin A. Every year, roughly half a billion capsules are made to be distributed and to be given to around 200 million children in over 100 ‘targeted’ countries (1,2). One standard method of dosing of younger children is shown in the picture above, which appears on the cover of a United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) working paper issued in 2005 (1). In most cases, this medicinal dosing is now being done in countries and areas where the vitamin A deficiency diseases xerophthalmia and blinding keratomalacia are now rare, and any clinical signs of vitamin A deficiency are now uncommon. download pdfpdf442 kb

Vitamin A saves lives. Sound science, sound policy
Keith P West Jr, Rolf DW Klemm, Alfred Sommer
 
Vitamin A deficiency can cause blindness, impair health, and be an underlying cause of death, in young children. Therefore, responsible debate about its public health importance, and the value of prevention, should be based on reliable evidence of the extent and severity of deficiency, and on the impact of interventions. download pdfpdf 315 kb

Universal Vitamin A Supplementation Programme in India: The need for a re-look  download pdfpdf 37 kb
The National Medical Journal of India - Vol. 23, No. 5, October 2010

20 Million US Dollars on Vitamin A Procurement : Out of 32 Million US Dollars of Annual Budget 2009-2010
The Indian scientists have raised their concern on over emphasis of Vitamin A supplementation to children. The recent research communications from Prof. Michael Latham and Prof. C. Gopalan have raised this issue with scientific evidence. These excerpts from the Annual Report of Micronutrients Initiatives India an International Non Government Organization, according to which out of 32 Million US Dollar available in the Annual Budget 2009-2010, more than 20 Million US Dollars were spent on Vitamin A Procurement and Interventions. A meager sum of 2.5 Million US Dollars were spent on Iron interventions.

Anaemia is most common nutritional deficiency disorders in the country. Almost vulnerable age groups have anaemia in the range of 60-90%. The health consequences of anaemia are highly detrimental to Maternal and Child Health. The prevalence of Vitamin A deficiency is less than one percent and is limited to selected geographical pockets in the country. The Keratomalacia and Nutritional Blindness have disappeared.

It is unfortunate but true that the agencies are trying to implement interventions for prevention and control of micronutrients disorders according to their mandate rather than the magnitude and health consequences.

 


WHO Resources
 

Nutrition for Health and Development (NHD)

Reproductive Health and Research (RHR

UNAIDS

 

General

Midwifery training modules

 


The State of World's Midwifery 2011: Delivering Health, Saving Lives
Increasing women's access to quality midwifery has become a focus of global efforts to realize the right of every woman to the best possible health care during pregnancy and childbirth. A first step is assessing the situation.

The State of World's Midwifery 2011: Delivering Health, Saving Lives, supported by 30 partners, provides the first comprehensive analysis of midwifery services and issues in countries where the needs are greatest.



Midwifery Resources

 

Planning

Guidelines and Training

Monitoring and Evaluation

Research


 

National Family Health Survey, India 1998-1999 (NFHS-2)

A large-scale National Family Health Survey (NFHS) in most of larger states and National Capital Territory of Delhi in 1992-1993. The repeated survey NFHS-2, 1998-1999. Both have focus on fertility and child mortality, family planning and health. NFHS 2 was funded by USAID through ORC Macro and UNICEF.

Clinical Management of Acute Diarrhoea - WHO/UNICEF Joint Statement
Clinical Management of Acute Diarrhoea - WHO/UNICEF Joint Statementpdf 348 kb


Consensus Statement of IAP National Task Force: Status Report on Management of Acute Diarrhea
Download this document in pdf formatpdf 376 kb


Census India - 2001

Rural - Urban distribution of population - India and states/Union territories

Demographics and Health Surveys [DHS] - India Publications
India Country Statistics - Indicators �1992/93  &  1998/99

Review of National Immunization Coverage1980-2002, India
WHO/UNICEF - October, 2003
13 pages -
Review of National Immunization Coverage in pdf formatpdf 125 kb


The Free And Compulsory Education Bill, 2004 - India
A Bill to provide free and compulsory education to all children from the age of six to fourteen years.

Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
CDC
Related Resources

 


 

Health and Healing Health and Healing is for first contact or primary health care workers. It is about both health and healing at the primary level. It offers a broad and comprehensive range of health topics from personal health to national health programmes, from system-wise illnesses to health problems of at-risk groups like women, children and old persons.  By Dr. Shyam Ashtekar

Off-site links

i-Quench.org/eDevelopment i-Quench.org/eDevelopment is a recent web portal dedicated to exploring new and emerging ICTs for development in India in the areas of health, education, poverty alleviation, agriculture, micro-finance, e-governance, trade of goods and services, market-based information dissemination - all leading to ICTs-supported holistic community development.



The Nutrition Transition Is Underway in India

Paula L. Griffiths, Margaret E. Bentley

Nutrition research in India has previously focused on the serious problem of undernutrition related to nutrient deficit and high rates of infection. Recent data from the National Family Health Survey 1998/99 (NFHS 2), however, identified a significant proportion of Indian women as overweight, coexisting with high rates of malnutrition. This paper examines the emerging nutrition transition for women living in rural and urban communities of Andhra Pradesh, India. NFHS 2 provides nationally representative data on women’s weight and height. In this paper, we examine representative data from the state of Andhra Pradesh (n = 4032 women). Logistic regression analyses are applied to the data to identify socioeconomic, regional and demographic determinants of overweight and thinness. The major nutrition problem facing women continues to be undernutrition, with 37% having a low body mass index [(BMI) < 18.5 kg/m2]; 8% of these women are severely malnourished (BMI < 16 kg/m2). However, 12% of the women can be classified as overweight (BMI > 25 kg/m2) and 2% are obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2). Furthermore, in the large cities of the state in which 4% of the sample live, 37% of women are overweight or obese, whereas in the rural areas in which 74% reside, 43% have a low BMI. Women from lower socioeconomic groups are also significantly more likely to have a low BMI. Findings from the logistic regression models reveal socioeconomic status to be a more important predictor of both over- and underweight than location of residence.
 


ndia - The Free and Compulsory Education Bill, 2004

 


Women's Health Links

Online Booklets:

Abortion | Cervical smears | DES | Fibroids | Heavy bleeding | HPV & genital warts | HRT | Hysterectomy
Know your menstrual cycle | Natural menopause | Ovarian problems | PID | PMS | Prolapse | Thrush | Vulval pain & discomfort


 

The links listed here are links to websites containing information on women's health issues which we think our visitors may find of interest. Inclusion on this page does not constitute an endorsement of the advice or services provided through these sites.
 

Adhesions

UK Adhesions Society (UK)
 

Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS)

Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS) Support Group (UK)
 

Contraception

Family Planning Association contains details of family planning clinics (UK)
Brook Advisory Centres for young people (UK)
Natural Family Planning Methods (UK)
 

Cystitis

Cystitis & Overactive Bladder Foundation (UK)
 

DES

DES Action USA (USA)
 

Donor & self insemination

Donor Conception Network (UK)
Pink Parents (UK)
 

Endometriosis

National Endometriosis Society (UK)
Endometriosis SHE Trust UK (UK)
 

Fibroids

Fibroid News (UK)
Centre for Uterine Fibroids Brigham and Women's Hospital (USA)
Fibroid Corner (USA)
Fibroid Information (USA)
Fibroid Discussion Group (UK)
 

Gynaecological cancers

National Cancer Institute (USA)
Cancer Bacup (UK)
Women's Cancer Network (USA)
Ovacome support for women with ovarian cancer (UK)
Jo's Trust for women with cervical cancer (UK)
 

Heavy bleeding

The National Endometriosis Society (UK)
Women Who Bleed support for women with bleeding disorders (UK)
The Haemophilia Society for women with bleeding disorders (UK)
 

HRT

A Friend Indeed Canadian menopause resource (Can)
 

Hysterectomy

Hysterectomy Association (UK)
HERS Foundation (USA)

Infertility

Infertility Network UK
Human Fertilisation & Embryology Authority information on IVF and other assisted conception techniques and lists of clinics (UK)
 

Menopause

North American Menopause Society (USA)
A Friend Indeed Canadian menopause resource (Can)
Premature Menopause Support Group (UK)
National Osteoporosis Society (UK)
International Osteoporosis Foundation
National Osteoporosis Foundation (USA)
The Hormone Foundation (USA)
 

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Association (USA)
Verity Polycyctic Ovaries Self Help Group (UK)
The Hormone Foundation (USA)
Excess body hair (UK)
 

Pregnancy and Childbirth

National Childbirth Trust (UK)
The Maternity Alliance (UK)
The Miscarriage Association (UK)
Active Birth Centre (UK)
Pelvic Partnership support for women with pelvic joint pain during or after pregnancy (UK)
 

Premenstrual Syndrome

National Association for Premenstrual Syndrome (UK)
 

Prolapse

Women's Diagnostic Cyber question and aswer section on prolapse (USA)
Dr Toaff's Alternatives to Hysterectomy article on alternatives to hysterectomy for prolapse written by an American surgeon (USA)
 

Thrush

Vaginal Discharge and Thrush (UK)
 

Unplanned pregnancy and abortion care

British Pregnancy Advisory Service (UK)
Marie Stopes International (UK)
Pro Choice Forum (UK)
Abortion Rights: The National Pro-Choice Campaign (UK)
Voice for Choice national campaign by the Pro Choice Alliance (UK)
 

Urinary Incontinence

The Continence Foundation (UK)
In Contact organisation of those affected by incontinence (UK)
 

Vulval Pain

Vulval Pain Society (UK)
 


Free Downloads from Hesperian

Hesperian Home > Books and Resources

Hesperian Health Guides are easy to use, medically accurate, and richly illustrated. We publish 20 titles, spanning women’s health, children, disabilities, dentistry, health education, HIV, and environmental health, and distribute many others. Buy, download, or read from this page, or view resources by language to explore materials in Spanish and over 80 other languages.

 

Where There Is No Doctor

The most widely-used health care manual for health workers, educators, and others involved in primary health care delivery and health promotion programs around the world. Our current edition contains updated information on malaria, HIV, and more.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ IN eREADER
 

Where Women Have No Doctor

An essential resource for any woman or health worker who wants to improve her health and the health of her community, and for anyone to learn about problems that affect women differently from men. Topics include reproductive health, concerns of girls and older women, violence, mental health, and more.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ ONLINE   |   READ IN eREADER
 

A Community Guide to Environmental Health

This guide contains information, activities, stories, and instructions for simple technologies that help health promoters, environmental activists, and community leaders take charge of their environmental health.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ IN eREADER
 

Advance Chapters from the NEW Where There Is No Doctor

Topics include care for newborns, breastfeeding, and nutrition. These are the first chapters completed of an all new, 21st-century edition of our hallmark publication.

DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ ONLINE
 

A Book for Midwives

A vital resource for practicing midwives and midwifery training programs around the world, this book covers the essentials of care before, during, and after birth. It has been updated to reflect new WHO/UNICEF guidelines and standards for mothers and newborns.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ IN eREADER
 

Where There Is No Dentist

This basic dental manual uses straightforward language and step-by-step instructions to discuss preventive care of teeth and gums, diagnosing and treating common dental problems, and includes a special chapter on oral health and HIV.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ IN eREADER
 

Helping Health Workers Learn

An indispensable resource for health educators, this book shows – with hundreds of methods, aids and learning strategies – how to make health education engaging and effective, and how to encourage community involvement through participatory education.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ IN eREADER
 

Disabled Village Children

This manual contains a wealth of clear and detailed information along with easy-to-implement strategies for all who are concerned about the well being of children with disabilities, especially those living in communities with limited resources.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ IN eREADER
 

A Health Handbook for Women with Disabilities

Developed with the participation of women with disabilities in 42 countries, this guide helps women to overcome the barriers of social stigma and inadequate care to improve their general health, self-esteem, and independence as active members of their communities.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ IN eREADER
 

Helping Children Who Are Deaf

This groundbreaking book, packed with activities on how to foster language learning through both sign and oral approaches, supports parents and other caregivers in building the communication skills of babies and young children.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ IN eREADER
 

Helping Children Who Are Blind

The simple and engaging activities in this book can help parents, caregivers, teachers, health workers, rehabilitation workers, and others help a child with vision problems develop all of his or her capabilities.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF   |   READ IN eREADER
 

HIV, Health and Your Community

A thorough, easy-to-understand guide for health workers confronting the HIV pandemic in their communities, it covers topics from biology of the virus to epidemiology to the mechanics of designing prevention programs, using language that is accessible to those with little medical training.

BUY
 

Pesticides Are Poison

This chapter from A Community Guide to Environmental Health, available as a 36-page booklet, offers information and activities to help reduce harm caused by pesticides, to treat people in pesticide emergencies, and to understand legal and political issues related to pesticide use.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF
 

Sanitation and Cleanliness

This chapter from A Community Guide to Environmental Health, available as a 48-page booklet, offers basic information on toilet building as well as learning activities to help communities understand and prevent sanitation-related health problems.

BUY   |   DOWNLOAD PDF
 

Water for Life

This chapter from A Community Guide to Environmental Health, available as a 48-page booklet, helps communities improve drinking water sources, treat water to make it safe for drinking, and organize water projects to protect access to clean water.

DOWNLOAD PDF
 

Advance Chapters from A Workers Guide to Health and Safety

Topics include work hazards and solutions in garment industries, social hazards and solutions in garment, electronics, and shoe industries, and activities for organizing worker-led campaigns. These chapters will be part of the upcoming publication, due to be released in 2012.

DOWNLOAD PDF
 

Also available: Hesperian books in Spanish, on CD, and books from other publishers

By visiting our bookstore, you can view and buy Hesperian titles in Spanish, on CD, and books from other publishers.
 

 


 

 

Other Resources

FAO - Download Assessment of the double burden of malnutrition in six case study countries (PDF zipped, 2.1Mb)


Asia: India: Education. Nationmaster. 26 Aug. 2005. Wikipedia Encyclopedia. 30 Aug. 2005

Bridging The Nutritional Divide. Swaminathan, M.S. The Little Magazine. 17th International Congress on Nutrition, Vienna, August 2001.

India Child Malnutrition Deaths. Chadha, Monica. BBC News, Mumbai. 27 Aug. 2005

Chronic Hunger and the Status of Women in India. Coonrod, S. Carol. The Hunger Project. 8 Aug. 2005

Demographics of India. Nationmaster. 26 Aug. 2005. Wikipedia Encyclopedia. 30 Aug. 2005

Detailed Facts and Statistics about India. Phrasebase. 2005. Phasebase. 26 June, 2005

Hunger Amidst Plenty. Dreze, Jean. India Together. Dec. 2003. Humanscape. 25 June 2005

Early Years. UNICEF. 6 Aug. 2005

Chronic Hunger and Obesity Epidemic. Gardner, Gary. Worldwatch Organization. 2 Aug. 2005

The Asian Diet Pyramid. Gifford, K. Oldways. Oldways Preservation & Exchange Trust. 20 June 2005

India has an Enormous Under-Nutrition and Over-Nutrition Problems. Haddad, Dr. Lawrence. 29 June, 2005

India: Latest. UNICEF. 30 June 2005

Child Malnutrition: Myths and Solutions. Kumar, A.K. Shiva. The Little Magazine. UNICEF. 27 June 2005

Child Nutrition in India. Mishra, Vinod. East-West Center. National Family Health Survey Subjects Reports. 30 June 2005

Food Fight For Hunger. Prasenjit Maiti. Council for Development Studies. 4 Aug. 2005

Family Life: India. Rajani, Chetan. The Settlement Organization. Cultural Profiles Project. 30 June 2005

SC Rules on Preventing Starvation Deaths. India Together. Right to Food litigation. 27 Aug. 2005

The Plight of Children in India. Statesman. Food Relief. Bhaktivedanta International Charities. 15 Aug. 2005.

Women’s Education Can Improve Child Nutrition in India. National Family Health Survey Bulletin. Feb. 2000. International Institute for Population Sciences Mumbai.

World Hunger Awareness

Global Database on Child Growth & Malnutrition (FAO)

Food Security Statistics (FAO)

Information on Vegetarian & Vegan Diets (PCRM)

Malnutrition Matters

Malnutrition (WikiPedia)

Malnutrition (WHO)

Nutrition Publications (WHO)

Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM)

Repositioning Nutrition as Central to Development: A Strategy for Large Scale Action (World Bank)

UN Millennium Development Goals

Women - The key to ending hunger (The Hunger Project)

World Hunger Map: [Asia] [Latin America & Caribbean] [Middle East, Central Asia, Eastern Europe] [West Africa] [Southern Africa] [East & Central Africa]

Flea bites on humans: A blog about flea bites symptoms, pictures, treatment and how to prevent flea bites on humans


Download Adobe Reader To view and print the pdf files that are available for download from our site, you can use the Free Adobe Reader. Please visit adobe.com for free downloading of the Adobe Reader.






 

 

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